Product Management Glossary

Check out our glossary of common product management terms and definition
search
Thank you! Your submission has been received!
Oops! Something went wrong while submitting the form.

2 Pair Programming

2 Pair Programming is a technique in product management where two pairs of developers work collaboratively on the same task. This method promotes knowledge sharing and collaboration, leading to better code quality and faster problem-solving.

Read More about
2 Pair Programming
east

A/B Testing

A/B testing is essentially an experiment where two or more variants are tested against each other to determine which variation is better.

Read More about
A/B Testing
east

API (Application Program Interface)

API (Application Program Interface) is a set of protocols, routines, and tools for building software applications. It specifies how software components should interact and enables communication between different software systems.

Read More about
API (Application Program Interface)
east

Accessibility testing

A testing process in which a product or feature is evaluated for its accessibility for users with disabilities.

Read More about
Accessibility testing
east

Adaptive Design

Adaptive design refers to GUI design that adapts to different screen sizes.

Read More about
Adaptive Design
east

Affiliate marketing

A marketing model where affiliates promote a product or service in exchange for a commission on sales.

Read More about
Affiliate marketing
east

Affinity Diagram

Affinity Diagram is a problem-solving technique that is used in product management to organize a large number of ideas or information into groups, based on their similarities.

Read More about
Affinity Diagram
east

Affinity Grouping

Affinity Grouping is the process of categorizing related items into groups based on their similarities in order to identify patterns and make informed decisions.

Read More about
Affinity Grouping
east

Agile

Agile is a project management methodology that emphasizes flexibility, collaboration, and continuous improvement in the development process. It involves iterative and incremental work cycles that aim to deliver working software quickly and efficiently.

Read More about
Agile
east

Agile Framework

Agile Framework is a methodology used in product development that emphasizes flexibility, collaboration, and customer satisfaction.

Read More about
Agile Framework
east

Agile Principles

Agile Principles refer to a set of values and principles for software development that prioritize customer satisfaction, collaboration, flexibility, and continuous improvement. These principles emphasize iterative and incremental development, adaptive planning, and rapid feedback.

Read More about
Agile Principles
east

Agile Product Development

Agile Product Development is a methodology that emphasizes flexibility, collaboration, and rapid iteration in the product development process. It involves cross-functional teams working together to deliver value to customers in small increments, with a focus on continuous improvement and adaptation to changing requirements.

Read More about
Agile Product Development
east

Agile Product Management

Agile Product Management is an iterative and flexible approach to product development that emphasizes customer feedback, collaboration, and continuous improvement. It involves breaking down large projects into smaller, manageable tasks and adapting to changing requirements throughout the development process.

Read More about
Agile Product Management
east

Agile Product Owner

Agile Product Owner is a key role in Agile product development responsible for defining and prioritizing the product backlog and ensuring the team works on the most valuable features for customers.

Read More about
Agile Product Owner
east

Agile Release Train

An Agile Release Train (ART) is a framework for organizing and executing complex software development projects using the Agile methodology.

Read More about
Agile Release Train
east

Agile Values

Agile Values refer to the set of guiding principles that influence the Agile methodology for software development.

Read More about
Agile Values
east

Agile coach

A professional who helps teams and organizations to adopt and apply Agile principles and practices.

Read More about
Agile coach
east

Agile development

A software development approach that emphasizes flexibility, collaboration, and continuous delivery.

Read More about
Agile development
east

Agile maturity model

The Agile maturity model is a framework that helps organizations assess their level of Agile adoption and identify areas for improvement. It consists of a set of stages or levels that an organization can progress through as it becomes more Agile. These levels typically include initial, repeatable, defined, managed, and optimizing. At each level, the organization is expected to have certain practices and processes in place, such as continuous integration, automated testing, and cross-functional teams. The Agile maturity model provides a roadmap for organizations to follow as they transition to Agile development, and helps them measure their progress along the way.

Read More about
Agile maturity model
east

Agile team

An Agile team is a cross-functional group of individuals who work together to deliver a product incrementally and iteratively, using Agile methodologies such as Scrum or Kanban. The team is self-organizing and empowered to make decisions, with a focus on collaboration, flexibility, and continuous improvement.

Read More about
Agile team
east

Agile transformation

Agile transformation is the process of adopting and implementing agile methodologies across an organization to improve efficiency, flexibility, and responsiveness to customer needs.

Read More about
Agile transformation
east

Alpha Test

Alpha Test is the initial phase of testing in the product development process, where the product is tested by a small group of internal users or stakeholders before it is released to a larger audience. It is intended to identify and fix any major issues or bugs before the product moves on to the next phase of testing or release.

Read More about
Alpha Test
east

Annual Recurring Revenue

Annual recurring revenue (ARR) is the annualized revenue generated from subscription-based recurring revenue streams.

Read More about
Annual Recurring Revenue
east

Backlog

A backlog is a prioritized list of features, enhancements, and bug fixes that a product team maintains and works through to deliver the desired product outcomes.

Read More about
Backlog
east

Backlog Refinement / Grooming

Backlog Refinement / Grooming is the process of reviewing and updating the product backlog to ensure that it is prioritized, well-defined, and ready for the next sprint. This involves breaking down user stories into smaller, more manageable tasks, estimating effort, and removing any items that are no longer relevant or necessary.

Read More about
Backlog Refinement / Grooming
east

Behavioral Product Management

Behavioral Product Management refers to the process of analyzing customer behavior data to inform product decisions and strategies.

Read More about
Behavioral Product Management
east

Beta Test

Beta Test refers to the process of delivering a product to a selected group of users prior to its official release to collect feedback, identify bugs and ensure all the features are working efficiently.

Read More about
Beta Test
east

Beta Testing

Beta testing is the process of releasing a product to a select group of users to gather feedback and identify any issues before the product is released to the general public.

Read More about
Beta Testing
east

Bill of Materials (BOM)

A Bill of Materials (BOM) is a comprehensive list of materials, components, and sub-assemblies required to manufacture a product.

Read More about
Bill of Materials (BOM)
east

Bubble Sort

Bubble Sort is a simple sorting algorithm that repeatedly steps through the list, compares adjacent elements and swaps them if they are in the wrong order.

Read More about
Bubble Sort
east

Bucket Sort

Bucket Sort is a comparison-based algorithm that sorts a list of elements by partitioning them into buckets and then sorting these buckets individually.

Read More about
Bucket Sort
east

Burndown Chart

A burndown chart is a visual tool used by agile teams to track the progress of their work during a sprint. It represents the amount of work remaining to be done versus the time left in the sprint.

Read More about
Burndown Chart
east

Business Agility

Business Agility refers to the ability of an organization to quickly adapt to changes in the market and internal environments, while still delivering value to customers and stakeholders. It requires a mindset of continuous improvement, and the ability to pivot quickly when necessary.

Read More about
Business Agility
east

Business Intelligence

Business Intelligence (BI) refers to the set of methodologies, processes, architectures, and technologies that transform raw data into meaningful and useful information, which can be used to enable more effective strategic, tactical, and operational insights and decision-making.

Read More about
Business Intelligence
east

Business Model

A business model is a framework for how a company creates, delivers, and captures value. It outlines the products or services offered, target customers, revenue streams, cost structure, and overall strategy for success.

Read More about
Business Model
east

Business Model Canvas

The Business Model Canvas is a strategic management tool that allows businesses to describe, design, challenge, invent, and pivot their business model in a structured and visual way.

Read More about
Business Model Canvas
east

Business Transformation

Business transformation is a process of reinventing an entire organization to adapt changes to its goals, processes, technologies, and products/services to improve its performance and competitiveness in the market.

Read More about
Business Transformation
east

Buy-a-Feature

Buy-a-Feature is a product development technique used to prioritize new features based on the demand and willingness to pay of customers. It involves presenting a list of potential features to customers and letting them 'buy' the ones they want to see developed by allocating a budget to each item.

Read More about
Buy-a-Feature
east

Buyer Persona

Buyer Persona is a semi-fictional representation of the ideal customer based on market research and data analysis, used to guide product development, sales, and marketing strategies.

Read More about
Buyer Persona
east

CIRCLES Method

The CIRCLES Method is a systematic approach to product management that involves assessing a product's features and identifying gaps in order to improve functionality and enhance user experience.

Read More about
CIRCLES Method
east

Cannibalization

Cannibalization is the negative impact on the sales of a current product when introducing a newer, similar product in the same market or product line.

Read More about
Cannibalization
east

Captive Product Pricing

Captive Product Pricing is the strategy of setting a low price for a core product and charging a higher price for supporting products or services that are necessary to use the core product.

Read More about
Captive Product Pricing
east

Certified Product Manager

Certified Product Manager is a professional certification awarded by the Association of International Product Marketing and Management (AIPMM) to individuals who have demonstrated proficiency in product management principles and practices.

Read More about
Certified Product Manager
east

Change Enablement

Change enablement is the practice of equipping teams and organizations with the tools, processes, and frameworks they need to support and manage change in a structured manner. It involves building a culture of change readiness and agility, enabling teams to proactively identify changes and respond to them effectively.

Read More about
Change Enablement
east

Change Management

Change Management is the systematic approach to dealing with change, both from the perspective of an organization and on an individual level. It includes methods for facilitating, tracking, and implementing changes to processes, procedures, technologies, and strategies.

Read More about
Change Management
east

Change Management Principles

Change Management Principles refer to the best practices and guidelines for managing changes in a project or organization in a controlled and systematic manner to minimize any negative impact on stakeholders and ensure successful delivery of the project objectives.

Read More about
Change Management Principles
east

Channels of Distribution

Channels of distribution are the routes through which products or services are channeled from the manufacturer or producer to the end consumer. It includes all the intermediaries such as wholesalers, distributors, retailers, and agents who help in the physical movement of goods from one place to another.

Read More about
Channels of Distribution
east

Chief Product Officer

The Chief Product Officer (CPO) is a C-level executive who is responsible for the company's product strategy and direction, as well as overseeing the entire product portfolio from ideation to launch and beyond.

Read More about
Chief Product Officer
east

Churn

"Churn" is a business term used to describe the rate at which customers or subscribers discontinue their use of a service or product.

Read More about
Churn
east

Churn Rate

Churn Rate is the percentage of customers who stop using a product or service during a given time period. It is calculated by dividing the number of customers lost during that period by the total number of customers at the beginning of the period.

Read More about
Churn Rate
east

Closing

Closing in Product Management refers to the final stage of the sales process where the customer makes the decision to purchase the product or not.

Read More about
Closing
east

Competitive Intelligence

Competitive Intelligence is the process of gathering and analyzing information about competitors, customers, and the marketplace to make informed strategic decisions for product management.

Read More about
Competitive Intelligence
east

Competitive Landscape

Competitive Landscape refers to the current and potential competition for a company within its market. It includes an analysis and evaluation of competitors' strengths, weaknesses, market share, product offerings, pricing strategies, and overall positioning.

Read More about
Competitive Landscape
east

Competitive analysis

Competitive analysis is the process of identifying and evaluating the strengths and weaknesses of competitors in a market, in order to make informed decisions about product development, marketing, and sales strategies.

Read More about
Competitive analysis
east

Concept Review

Concept Review is the process of evaluating new product ideas, examining their feasibility and viability, and determining whether the investment of time, resources, and money is worth it.

Read More about
Concept Review
east

Content marketing

Content marketing is a strategic marketing approach focused on creating and distributing valuable, relevant, and consistent content to attract and retain a clearly defined audience — and, ultimately, to drive profitable customer action.

Read More about
Content marketing
east

Continuous Delivery

Continuous Delivery is a software development approach in which code changes are automatically prepared, tested, and released to production with minimal manual intervention.

Read More about
Continuous Delivery
east

Continuous Deployment

Continuous Deployment is a software engineering approach in which any code change that passes all stages of the production pipeline is automatically released into the production environment, without human intervention.

Read More about
Continuous Deployment
east

Continuous Discovery

Continuous Discovery is an ongoing process of gathering customer feedback and insights to inform product decisions and ensure that the product remains relevant and valuable to its users.

Read More about
Continuous Discovery
east

Continuous Improvement

Continuous Improvement is an ongoing approach to enhancing products, processes and services by incrementally and continuously improving them over time.

Read More about
Continuous Improvement
east

Continuous Integration

Continuous Integration is a software development practice where code changes are frequently and automatically merged into a shared repository. This allows for early detection of integration issues and ensures that the software is always in a releasable state.

Read More about
Continuous Integration
east

Cost of Delay

Cost of Delay (CoD) is a concept used in product management to quantify the impact of delaying the delivery of a project or feature.

Read More about
Cost of Delay
east

Cross Browser Testing

Cross Browser Testing is the process of testing a website or web application across multiple web browsers to ensure compatibility and consistency of the user experience. This involves identifying and addressing any issues or bugs that may arise due to differences in browser rendering, functionality, or performance.

Read More about
Cross Browser Testing
east

Cross-Functional Team

A Cross-Functional Team is a group of individuals from various departments or areas of expertise within a company who work together to achieve a specific goal or project.

Read More about
Cross-Functional Team
east

Cross-selling

Cross-selling is a sales technique where a company promotes complementary or additional products to a customer who has already made a purchase, with the aim of increasing revenue and enhancing customer satisfaction.

Read More about
Cross-selling
east

Crystal Agile Framework

The Crystal Agile Framework is a software development methodology that emphasizes team collaboration, flexible planning, and frequent delivery of working software.

Read More about
Crystal Agile Framework
east

Customer Advisory Board

Customer Advisory Board is a group of strategically selected customers who are invited to regularly provide valuable feedback and insights to a company's product management team.

Read More about
Customer Advisory Board
east

Customer Empathy

Customer empathy refers to the ability of product managers to understand the feelings, needs, and challenges of their customers, in order to create products that meet their expectations and solve their problems.

Read More about
Customer Empathy
east

Customer Experience

Customer experience refers to the overall interaction and perception customers have of a company's products or services throughout their entire journey, from discovery to purchase and beyond.

Read More about
Customer Experience
east

Customer Journey Map

Customer Journey Map is a visual representation of the entire customer experience, mapping it from start to end highlighting all possible interactions. It helps product managers to view the customer’s experience from their perspective and make improvements in it.

Read More about
Customer Journey Map
east

Customer acquisition cost (CAC)

Customer acquisition cost (CAC) is the total cost incurred by a company to acquire a new customer, including all marketing and sales expenses. It is calculated by dividing the total cost of sales and marketing by the number of new customers acquired during a specific period of time.

Read More about
Customer acquisition cost (CAC)
east

Customer churn rate

Customer churn rate is the percentage of customers who stop using a product or service during a certain period of time. It is a key metric for product managers to measure customer retention and identify areas for improvement.

Read More about
Customer churn rate
east

Customer development

Customer development is a process of understanding customer needs and validating product hypotheses through continuous feedback and iteration.

Read More about
Customer development
east

Customer development interview

A customer development interview is a research method used by product managers to gain insights into the needs, behaviors, and pain points of potential customers. It involves conducting one-on-one interviews with target customers to validate assumptions and refine product ideas.

Read More about
Customer development interview
east

Customer development survey questions

Customer development survey questions are a set of questions designed to gather information from potential or existing customers in order to understand their needs, preferences, and pain points. These questions are used by product managers to inform product development and improve customer satisfaction.

Read More about
Customer development survey questions
east

Customer experience (CX)

Customer experience (CX) refers to the overall perception a customer has of a company based on all interactions and touchpoints with the company, including pre-sale, sale, and post-sale interactions. It encompasses the emotional, physical, and psychological aspects of the customer's journey and can greatly impact customer loyalty and retention.

Read More about
Customer experience (CX)
east

Customer feedback

Customer feedback refers to the information provided by customers about their experience with a product or service. This feedback can be used by product managers to improve the product and meet customer needs.

Read More about
Customer feedback
east

Customer lifetime value (CLV)

Customer lifetime value (CLV) is the total amount of money a customer is expected to spend on a company's products or services over the course of their lifetime. It is a metric used to determine the long-term value of a customer to a business.

Read More about
Customer lifetime value (CLV)
east

Customer needs

Customer needs refer to the desires, requirements, and expectations of a customer that a product or service must fulfill in order to satisfy them and provide value.

Read More about
Customer needs
east

Customer pain points

Customer pain points refer to the specific problems or challenges that customers face when using a product or service, which can negatively impact their overall experience and satisfaction.

Read More about
Customer pain points
east

Customer persona

A customer persona is a fictional representation of a target customer group that is based on market research and data. It includes demographic information, behavior patterns, motivations, and goals, and is used to guide product development and marketing strategies.

Read More about
Customer persona
east

Customer relationship management (CRM)

Customer relationship management (CRM) is a strategy for managing a company's interactions with customers and potential customers. It involves using technology to organize, automate, and synchronize sales, marketing, customer service, and technical support processes.

Read More about
Customer relationship management (CRM)
east

Customer retention

Customer retention refers to the ability of a company to retain its existing customers over a period of time. It is a measure of customer loyalty and satisfaction, and is often achieved through effective customer service, personalized marketing, and product quality.

Read More about
Customer retention
east

Customer retention rate

Customer retention rate is the percentage of customers who continue to do business with a company over a certain period of time. It is calculated by dividing the number of customers retained by the total number of customers at the beginning of the period and multiplying by 100.

Read More about
Customer retention rate
east

Customer segmentation

Customer segmentation is the process of dividing a customer base into smaller groups of individuals who have similar needs or characteristics. This allows companies to tailor their marketing efforts and product offerings to specific segments, ultimately increasing customer satisfaction and profitability.

Read More about
Customer segmentation
east

Customer service

Customer service in product management refers to the support and assistance provided to customers before, during, and after their purchase of a product. It includes activities such as answering customer inquiries, resolving complaints, and providing technical support.

Read More about
Customer service
east

Customer service level agreement (SLA)

A Customer Service Level Agreement (SLA) is a contract between a service provider and a customer that outlines the level of service the customer can expect to receive, including metrics such as response time, resolution time, and availability. SLAs help ensure that both parties have a clear understanding of expectations and responsibilities.

Read More about
Customer service level agreement (SLA)
east

Customer success management

Customer success management is the process of ensuring that customers achieve their desired outcomes while using a product or service, by providing support, guidance, and resources to help them succeed.

Read More about
Customer success management
east

Customer validation

Customer validation is the process of testing and validating a product idea or feature with actual customers to ensure that it meets their needs and solves their problems.

Read More about
Customer validation
east

DACI Decision-Making Framework

DACI Decision-Making Framework is a model for decision-making that stands for Driver, Approver, Contributor, and Informed. It is a clear and effective way of ensuring everyone involved in the decision-making process is on the same page.

Read More about
DACI Decision-Making Framework
east

DEEP Backlog

DEEP Backlog refers to a backlog characterized by Detailed, Emergent, Estimated, and Prioritized items, which helps product managers keep track of tasks and keep their product roadmap up-to-date.

Read More about
DEEP Backlog
east

Daily Scrum

Daily Scrum is a daily meeting that is a part of Agile product management, where team members come together to discuss their activities, goals, and potential blockers for the day.

Read More about
Daily Scrum
east

Data Product Manager

A Data Product Manager is a professional who is responsible for the development and management of data-driven products that can be monetized by an organization. They work closely with cross-functional teams to ensure that the product meets the needs of the target audience and that it aligns with the organization's goals and objectives.

Read More about
Data Product Manager
east

Definition of Done

Definition of Done is a team agreement in product development that outlines the conditions which require all work to be considered complete.

Read More about
Definition of Done
east

Definition of Ready

Definition of Ready refers to a checklist of criteria that a user story, feature, or epic must meet before it is deemed ready to be worked on by the development team.

Read More about
Definition of Ready
east

Dependency

Dependency in product management refers to the relationships between tasks and components that affect the timeline, feasibility, and success of a project.

Read More about
Dependency
east

Design Concept

Design concept is an abstract, high-level plan that represents the intended vision or direction of a product's design. It serves as the foundation for the design process and guides the development of a product's features and functionality.

Read More about
Design Concept
east

Design Ops

Design Ops is a framework that enables cross-functional teams to collaborate, streamline and optimize their design processes. This approach applies principles from DevOps to the design process, emphasizing shared ownership, effective communication, and continuous improvement.

Read More about
Design Ops
east

Design Thinking

Design Thinking is a problem-solving approach that focuses on understanding the user's needs and designing solutions that meet those needs. It involves empathy, creativity, and iteration to arrive at innovative solutions.

Read More about
Design Thinking
east

Design system

A design system is a collection of reusable components, guidelines, and standards that are used to design and develop consistent, user-friendly products across an organization.

Read More about
Design system
east

DevOps

DevOps is a software development approach that combines development and operations teams to enhance collaboration, automate software delivery, and improve the quality of software products.

Read More about
DevOps
east

Digital Product Manager

A Digital Product Manager is responsible for the entire lifecycle of a digital product, from ideation to launch and ongoing management, including product planning and execution, market research, product design, user experience, and product marketing.

Read More about
Digital Product Manager
east

Digital Transformation

Digital transformation is the process of integrating digital technology into all areas of a business, fundamentally changing how it operates and delivers value to customers.

Read More about
Digital Transformation
east

Disciplined Agile (DA)

Disciplined Agile (DA) is a process decision framework that provides teams with contextual guidance on how to effectively create and deliver innovative solutions at enterprise scale. It promotes a pragmatic, situationally specific, and contextually informed approach to agile and lean delivery.

Read More about
Disciplined Agile (DA)
east

Disruptive Innovation

Disruptive Innovation refers to the creation of a new market by providing a simpler, more affordable product or service that disrupts the existing market and displaces established competitors.

Read More about
Disruptive Innovation
east

Distinctive Competence

Distinctive competence is a unique attribute or set of competencies that differentiate an organization from its competitors and create a competitive advantage.

Read More about
Distinctive Competence
east

Documentation

Documentation refers to the process of recording important information related to a product's development, usage, and maintenance.

Read More about
Documentation
east

Dual-Track Agile

Dual-Track Agile is a product development methodology that involves running two parallel tracks - one for discovery and one for delivery - to ensure that the product being developed meets the needs of the users while also being feasible and viable from a business perspective.

Read More about
Dual-Track Agile
east

Dynamic Systems Development Method (DSDM)

Dynamic Systems Development Method (DSDM) is a framework for agile software development that aims to deliver practical and functional solutions within strict timeframes and budgets.

Read More about
Dynamic Systems Development Method (DSDM)
east

Eisenhower Matrix

The Eisenhower Matrix is a decision-making tool used in product management, based on the urgency and importance of tasks.

Read More about
Eisenhower Matrix
east

Email marketing

Email marketing is a digital marketing strategy that involves sending promotional messages or advertisements to a group of people via email. It is used to build relationships with potential customers, keep current customers informed and updated on company news or offers, and to encourage customer loyalty and repeat business.

Read More about
Email marketing
east

Empathy Maps

Empathy Maps are a visual tool used by Product Managers to understand the needs, behaviors, and emotions of their target users. They help PMs to develop a deeper understanding of their users and create products that meet their needs.

Read More about
Empathy Maps
east

End-User Era

End-User Era refers to the prevailing business strategy of designing and developing products with the final end-user in mind. It is a departure from the traditional inward-looking approach of creating products based on internal company goals and objectives.

Read More about
End-User Era
east

Engineering Backlog

Engineering backlog is a list of technical tasks that software development teams need to complete during a product's development cycle.

Read More about
Engineering Backlog
east

Enterprise Architecture Planning

Enterprise Architecture Planning (EAP) is a process used by organizations to align their business goals with their technology infrastructure. It involves designing the organization's overall IT strategy and roadmap for technology investments.

Read More about
Enterprise Architecture Planning
east

Enterprise Architecture Roadmap

Enterprise Architecture Roadmap is a strategic plan that outlines the technology infrastructure and processes required to achieve an organization's goals.

Read More about
Enterprise Architecture Roadmap
east

Enterprise Feedback Management

Enterprise Feedback Management (EFM) is the systematic approach to capturing, managing, and using feedback data across an organization's entire customer journey to make informed decisions and continuous improvements.

Read More about
Enterprise Feedback Management
east

Enterprise Transformation

Enterprise Transformation is the process of changing an organization's entire business model or strategy to achieve specific goals or objectives.

Read More about
Enterprise Transformation
east

Epics

Epics are large, high-level user stories that capture a big, overarching business objective. They are typically too big to be completed in a single sprint and are broken down into smaller user stories or tasks.

Read More about
Epics
east

Event marketing

Event marketing is a promotional strategy that involves creating a themed display, exhibit, or presentation to promote a product, service, cause, or organization. It is a way to engage with potential customers in a face-to-face setting and create a memorable experience that can lead to increased brand awareness and sales.

Read More about
Event marketing
east

Experiments

Experiments in Product Management refer to the process of testing and validating hypotheses about product features, user behavior, and market fit through controlled tests and data analysis.

Read More about
Experiments
east

Feature

A feature is a specific functionality or attribute of a product that provides value to the user and differentiates it from other products in the market.

Read More about
Feature
east

Feature Audit

A feature audit is a review of all features in a product to assess their effectiveness and relevance to the product's goal.

Read More about
Feature Audit
east

Feature Bloat

Feature Bloat refers to the phenomenon where a product has too many features, making it complex and difficult to use. This can lead to decreased user satisfaction and increased development and maintenance costs.

Read More about
Feature Bloat
east

Feature Creep

Feature creep refers to the continuous addition of unnecessary features to a product beyond what was originally planned or required.

Read More about
Feature Creep
east

Feature Driven Development (FDD)

Feature Driven Development (FDD) is an iterative and incremental software development process that emphasizes on systematically building software functionality or features and delivering them in short cycles. It is a client-centric, architecture-centric and team-based approach to software development.

Read More about
Feature Driven Development (FDD)
east

Feature Factory

Feature Factory is a term used to describe an environment in which a product team pushes out features at a rapid pace with little oversight or feedback from users.

Read More about
Feature Factory
east

Feature Flag

A feature flag is a software development technique that allows developers to turn specific features or functionality on or off without deploying new code. It enables product managers to test new features with a subset of users before rolling them out to everyone.

Read More about
Feature Flag
east

Feature Gap Analysis

Feature Gap Analysis is a process of identifying the difference between the features of a product that are currently available and the features that are desired by the customers. It helps in prioritizing the development of new features and improving the existing ones to meet the customer needs.

Read More about
Feature Gap Analysis
east

Feature Kickoff

Feature kickoff is the process of introducing a new feature or product to the development team and stakeholders, outlining its purpose, goals, and requirements.

Read More about
Feature Kickoff
east

Feature Outcome Assessment

Feature Outcome Assessment is a process that involves analyzing the success of a feature request or enhancement, in terms of KPIs or metrics, after it has been implemented.

Read More about
Feature Outcome Assessment
east

Feature Release

Feature Release refers to a process in product management where a new product or an upgrade to an existing product is released to customers.

Read More about
Feature Release
east

Feature prioritization

Feature prioritization is the process of determining the relative importance or urgency of different features or functionalities of a product, in order to allocate resources and focus on the most valuable or critical ones.

Read More about
Feature prioritization
east

Feature roadmap

A feature roadmap is a high-level plan that outlines the development of new product features over a specific period of time. It helps product managers prioritize and communicate the features that will be added to a product and when they will be released.

Read More about
Feature roadmap
east

Feature-Less Roadmap

A feature-less roadmap is a strategic plan that focuses on high-level goals, objectives, and initiatives rather than specific features or functionalities of a product.

Read More about
Feature-Less Roadmap
east

Features

Features refer to the distinct functionality or characteristics of a product that satisfy user needs or contribute to their satisfaction, and differentiate it from other products.

Read More about
Features
east

Feedback Management

Feedback management is the process of collecting, analyzing and using feedback received from customers or users to improve the product or service. The goal is to identify areas of improvement and create positive customer experiences.

Read More about
Feedback Management
east

Fibonacci Agile Estimation

Fibonacci Agile Estimation is a type of estimation method used in agile software development, which involves assigning relative values to user stories based on the Fibonacci sequence.

Read More about
Fibonacci Agile Estimation
east

Finance Product Manager

A Finance Product Manager is responsible for developing and managing financial products and services that meet the needs of customers, while also meeting the financial goals of the company.

Read More about
Finance Product Manager
east

Fundamentally New Product

Fundamentally New Product refers to a product that represents a significant departure from the existing products offered by a company or in the market, in terms of its features, technology or design.

Read More about
Fundamentally New Product
east

GIST Planning

GIST Planning is a product management framework that stands for Goals, Ideas, Step-Projects, and Tasks. It is used to prioritize and organize product development efforts.

Read More about
GIST Planning
east

Gantt Chart

A Gantt chart is a type of bar chart that illustrates a project schedule, showing the start and end dates of each task and its dependencies. It was developed by Henry Gantt in the early 1900s and is widely used by project managers today.

Read More about
Gantt Chart
east

General availability (GA)

General availability (GA) is a term used to describe the stage in a product's lifecycle when it is fully released and available to the public for purchase or use.

Read More about
General availability (GA)
east

Go-to-Market Strategy

Go-to-Market Strategy is a comprehensive plan outlining how a company will introduce and promote its products or services to its target audience, including the marketing channels and messaging to be used, pricing, and sales strategies.

Read More about
Go-to-Market Strategy
east

Greenfield Project

Greenfield Project refers to a project that is developed from scratch, without any prior constraints or limitations.

Read More about
Greenfield Project
east

Group Product Manager

A Group Product Manager (GPM) is a senior-level product manager who manages a group or suite of related products within a company. They oversee product development, go-to-market strategy, and performance of the product suite within the overall product portfolio.

Read More about
Group Product Manager
east

Growth Product Manager

A Growth Product Manager is responsible for driving growth and revenue for a product or a business by optimizing and scaling the customer acquisition, retention and monetization strategies.

Read More about
Growth Product Manager
east

HEART Framework

HEART Framework is a methodology that measures user experience by analyzing five key metrics: Happiness, Engagement, Adoption, Retention, and Task success.

Read More about
HEART Framework
east

Hook Model

The Hook Model is a psychological framework that helps product managers design products that create habitual user behavior.

Read More about
Hook Model
east

Hooked Method

The Hooked Method is a product development framework that focuses on creating habit-forming products by understanding user behavior and designing products that create a strong emotional connection and habit loop.

Read More about
Hooked Method
east

ICE Scoring Model

The ICE Scoring Model is a popular method among product managers to gauge the potential impact, confidence, and ease of implementation for a particular product initiative or feature.

Read More about
ICE Scoring Model
east

IT Management

IT Management is the process of overseeing all technology resources within an organization to ensure they are being used effectively and efficiently to meet business goals.

Read More about
IT Management
east

IT Project Manager

An IT Project Manager is a professional responsible for overseeing the planning, execution, and delivery of technology projects within an organization.

Read More about
IT Project Manager
east

Idea Backlog

Idea backlog is a list of potential ideas or features that can be added to a product in the future, prioritized by their value and feasibility.

Read More about
Idea Backlog
east

Idea Management

Idea Management is the process of collecting, organizing, evaluating, and prioritizing new product ideas from various sources, including customers, employees, and stakeholders, to determine which ideas should be pursued and developed into successful products.

Read More about
Idea Management
east

Ideation

Ideation is the process of brainstorming and generating new ideas for a product or project.

Read More about
Ideation
east

Impact Map

An Impact Map is a visual representation of the relationship between business goals, user needs, and product features. It helps product managers prioritize features based on their potential impact on the business and the user.

Read More about
Impact Map
east

Impact Mapping

Impact Mapping is a product management methodology used for visualizing and aligning business goals with product development outcomes.

Read More about
Impact Mapping
east

Implicit Requirements

Implicit requirements are requirements that are not explicitly communicated or documented, but are assumed to be understood by stakeholders or implied by the context of the project.

Read More about
Implicit Requirements
east

Incident Management Practice

Incident Management Practice refers to the systematic approach of identifying, analyzing, and responding to incidents that may cause disruption to business operations, services, or functions. The practice involves establishing standard procedures and protocols for detecting, reporting, and resolving incidents, as well as mitigating their impact and preventing their recurrence.

Read More about
Incident Management Practice
east

Incremental Innovation

Incremental innovation is a type of innovation that involves making small, gradual improvements to existing products, processes, or services rather than introducing completely new ones.

Read More about
Incremental Innovation
east

Influencer marketing

Influencer marketing is a type of marketing that focuses on using key leaders to drive your brand's message to the larger market. These influencers can be well-known celebrities or social media personalities with a large following and can help increase brand awareness and drive sales.

Read More about
Influencer marketing
east

Information Flows in Product Management

Information flows in product management refer to the movement of data and knowledge across different stages and stakeholders of the product development process.

Read More about
Information Flows in Product Management
east

Information Technology

Information Technology (IT) is a field of study focused on the acquisition, processing, storage, and distribution of digital information.

Read More about
Information Technology
east

Initiative

Initiative in Product Management refers to a new project or idea that is proposed and planned by the product team to achieve a specific goal or solve a problem.

Read More about
Initiative
east

Innovation Management

Innovation management refers to the process of managing an organization's innovation strategy, resources, and operations to increase its effectiveness in producing new ideas, products, and services.

Read More about
Innovation Management
east

Integration testing

Integration testing is a software testing technique that tests the interaction between different software modules. It aims to identify defects in the interfaces and interactions between these modules before they are deployed to production.

Read More about
Integration testing
east

Intuitive Design

Intuitive design refers to designing a product interface that is user-friendly and easy to understand without the need for instructions.

Read More about
Intuitive Design
east

IoT (Internet of Things) Product Manager

An IoT (Internet of Things) Product Manager is an individual who manages the development and delivery of IoT products, including hardware and software components, to meet the needs of consumers and businesses.

Read More about
IoT (Internet of Things) Product Manager
east

Iteration

Iteration refers to the process of repeating a set of steps, typically in software development, to improve an outcome in a cyclical and incremental manner.

Read More about
Iteration
east

Iterative Testing

Iterative testing is a software development practice where a product is tested repeatedly and feedback is used to refine and improve the product.

Read More about
Iterative Testing
east

Jira

Jira is a popular software solution for agile product management, developed by Atlassian. It offers features such as issue tracking, project management, and workflow customization for software development teams.

Read More about
Jira
east

Jobs-to-be-done Framework

The Jobs-to-be-done Framework is a product management approach that focuses on understanding the underlying needs and motivations of customers by identifying the specific jobs they are trying to accomplish and designing products that help them achieve those goals.

Read More about
Jobs-to-be-done Framework
east

K-Means Clustering

K-Means Clustering is a machine learning algorithm used to group similar data points together based on their distance from each other. It is commonly used in product management to segment customers or products based on their similarities and differences.

Read More about
K-Means Clustering
east

K-Nearest Neighbor (KNN)

K-Nearest Neighbor (KNN) is a machine learning algorithm used for classification and regression. It works by finding the K nearest data points in the training set to a given input and predicting the output based on the majority class or average value of those K points.

Read More about
K-Nearest Neighbor (KNN)
east

KANO Model

The KANO Model is a product management framework that categorizes customer preferences into three categories: basic, performance, and delight. It helps product managers prioritize features and functionalities based on their impact on customer satisfaction.

Read More about
KANO Model
east

KPI Dashboard

A KPI Dashboard is a visual representation of key performance indicators (KPIs) that provides product managers with a quick and easy way to monitor and track the success of their product. It allows them to identify trends, track progress towards goals, and make data-driven decisions.

Read More about
KPI Dashboard
east

KPIs

KPIs (Key Performance Indicators) are measurable values that demonstrate how effectively a company is achieving its business objectives. They are used to evaluate the success of a product or service and help identify areas for improvement.

Read More about
KPIs
east

Kaizen

Kaizen is a Japanese term that means continuous improvement. In product management, it refers to the practice of constantly improving products and processes through small, incremental changes.

Read More about
Kaizen
east

Kanban

Kanban is a visual project management tool that helps teams to manage work by visualizing workflow, limiting work in progress, and maximizing efficiency. It originated in the manufacturing industry but has since been adopted by software development teams.

Read More about
Kanban
east

Kanban Board

A Kanban board is a visual project management tool that helps teams visualize work, optimize workflow, and prioritize tasks.

Read More about
Kanban Board
east

Kanban Roadmap

The Kanban Roadmap is a visual representation of the product development process that uses the Kanban methodology. It outlines the stages of development and the tasks that need to be completed in each stage, providing a clear overview of the project's progress and priorities.

Read More about
Kanban Roadmap
east

Kernel Product

A kernel product is the core product that serves as the foundation for a product line, and is typically the most profitable and widely used product in the line.

Read More about
Kernel Product
east

Key Performance Indicator (KPI)

A Key Performance Indicator (KPI) is a measurable value that helps to determine how well a company is achieving its business objectives.

Read More about
Key Performance Indicator (KPI)
east

Key Results

Key Results are specific, measurable, and time-bound outcomes that a product team aims to achieve in order to track progress towards a larger goal or objective.

Read More about
Key Results
east

Key Success Factors

Key Success Factors in Product Management refer to the critical elements that must be in place for a product to succeed in the market. These factors can include things like market research, competitive analysis, product design, pricing strategy, and marketing tactics.

Read More about
Key Success Factors
east

Key performance indicators (KPIs)

Key performance indicators (KPIs) are measurable values that demonstrate how effectively a company is achieving its key business objectives. KPIs are used to evaluate the success of a product or service and help identify areas for improvement.

Read More about
Key performance indicators (KPIs)
east

Kickoff Meeting

A Kickoff Meeting is a meeting held at the beginning of a project or product development cycle where the team gathers to align on goals, objectives, timelines, and responsibilities. It sets the tone for the project and ensures everyone is on the same page.

Read More about
Kickoff Meeting
east

Kill Switch

A kill switch is a feature in a product that allows the product owner or administrator to remotely disable the product or a specific feature in the product in case of an emergency or security threat.

Read More about
Kill Switch
east

Knowledge Base

A knowledge base is a centralized repository of information that is used to store, organize, and share knowledge and information within an organization. It is a tool used by product managers to collect and maintain information about their products, customers, and market trends.

Read More about
Knowledge Base
east

Knowledge Management

Knowledge Management in Product Management refers to the process of identifying, capturing, organizing, and sharing knowledge and information within an organization to improve decision-making, problem-solving, and innovation.

Read More about
Knowledge Management
east

Known Unknowns

Known Unknowns refer to the risks and uncertainties that are identified and acknowledged by a product manager, but cannot be quantified or predicted with certainty. These uncertainties can impact the success of a product and must be managed accordingly.

Read More about
Known Unknowns
east

Landing Page

A landing page is a standalone web page designed specifically for a marketing or advertising campaign. It is created with the intention of driving visitors to take a specific action, such as filling out a form or making a purchase.

Read More about
Landing Page
east

Launch Plan

A launch plan is a comprehensive strategy outlining the steps and tactics necessary to successfully introduce a new product to the market. It includes details on target audience, marketing channels, pricing, distribution, and more.

Read More about
Launch Plan
east

LeSS (Large Scale Scrum)

LeSS (Large Scale Scrum) is a framework for scaling Scrum to larger organizations, involving multiple teams working on the same product or project.

Read More about
LeSS (Large Scale Scrum)
east

Lead Product Manager

A Lead Product Manager is a high-level management position responsible for overseeing a team of product managers throughout the product development process.

Read More about
Lead Product Manager
east

Lead Time

Lead time refers to the amount of time it takes for a product to be manufactured and delivered to the customer, from the moment the order is placed to the moment it is received. It includes all the steps involved in the production process, such as sourcing materials, manufacturing, and shipping.

Read More about
Lead Time
east

Lead generation

Lead generation is the process of identifying and cultivating potential customers for a business's products or services. It involves capturing interest in a product or service for the purpose of developing a sales pipeline.

Read More about
Lead generation
east

Lead qualification

Lead qualification is the process of determining whether a potential customer is a good fit for a product or service based on their needs, budget, authority, and timeline.

Read More about
Lead qualification
east

Lean Analytics

Lean Analytics is a methodology that focuses on using data to drive decision-making and product development in a lean startup. It involves measuring and analyzing key metrics to gain insights into customer behavior and product performance, and using those insights to make data-driven decisions about product development and growth.

Read More about
Lean Analytics
east

Lean MVP

Lean MVP is a minimum viable product that has only the core features necessary to test the product hypothesis and gather feedback from early adopters. It is developed quickly and with minimal resources to validate the product idea before investing significant time and money into development.

Read More about
Lean MVP
east

Lean Product Development

Lean Product Development is a methodology that focuses on creating products with the least amount of waste possible. It emphasizes rapid prototyping, customer feedback, and continuous improvement to deliver products that meet customer needs efficiently and effectively.

Read More about
Lean Product Development
east

Lean Software Development

Lean Software Development is a methodology that aims to minimize waste while maximizing customer value by continuously delivering small releases and actively involving the customer in the development process.

Read More about
Lean Software Development
east

Lean UX

Lean UX is a methodology that focuses on reducing waste in the product development process by incorporating user feedback early and often, and iterating quickly to create a user-centered design.

Read More about
Lean UX
east

Lean canvas

The Lean Canvas is a one-page business plan template that helps product managers and entrepreneurs quickly identify and communicate key elements of their product or business idea, including customer segments, value propositions, channels, customer relationships, revenue streams, key metrics, cost structure, and unique selling points.

Read More about
Lean canvas
east

Lean metrics

Lean metrics are a set of measurements used by product managers to evaluate the effectiveness of their product development process. These metrics focus on minimizing waste and maximizing value for the customer, and can include metrics such as cycle time, lead time, and defect rate.

Read More about
Lean metrics
east

Lean principles

Lean principles are a set of methodologies and practices aimed at minimizing waste and maximizing value in product development. This approach emphasizes continuous improvement, customer focus, and a data-driven decision-making process.

Read More about
Lean principles
east

Lean startup

Lean startup is a methodology for developing businesses and products that aims to shorten product development cycles and rapidly discover if a proposed business model is viable; this is achieved by adopting a combination of business-hypothesis-driven experimentation, iterative product releases, and validated learning.

Read More about
Lean startup
east

Learning Loop

The Learning Loop in Product Management is a continuous process of gathering customer feedback, analyzing it, and using the insights to improve the product. It involves testing hypotheses, measuring results, and iterating on the product to achieve better outcomes.

Read More about
Learning Loop
east

Legacy System

A legacy system is an outdated technology or software that is still in use because it is too expensive or difficult to replace. These systems often lack modern features and can be a hindrance to innovation and progress.

Read More about
Legacy System
east

LifeTime Value (LTV)

LifeTime Value (LTV) is the total amount of revenue a customer is expected to generate for a business over the course of their relationship. It takes into account factors such as customer retention, repeat purchases, and the average amount spent per transaction.

Read More about
LifeTime Value (LTV)
east

Lifecycle Management

Lifecycle Management is the process of managing a product from its conception to its retirement. It involves planning, development, launch, growth, maturity, and eventual decline or discontinuation of the product.

Read More about
Lifecycle Management
east

Line Extension

Line Extension is a product management strategy where a company introduces additional variations of an existing product line to cater to different customer needs or preferences.

Read More about
Line Extension
east

Localization

Localization is the process of adapting a product or service to meet the language, cultural, and other specific requirements of a particular country or region.

Read More about
Localization
east

Long-Tail Product

A long-tail product is a niche product that has a low sales volume but a high profit margin, typically sold through online channels and targeted towards a specific customer segment.

Read More about
Long-Tail Product
east

Loss Aversion

Loss aversion is a cognitive bias where people feel the pain of loss more strongly than the pleasure of gain, leading them to avoid losses rather than seeking gains.

Read More about
Loss Aversion
east

Low-Fidelity Prototype

A low-fidelity prototype is a basic, rough, and incomplete representation of a product that is used to test and validate early design concepts and ideas. It is typically created using simple materials and tools, such as paper, cardboard, or wireframes, and is meant to be quick and easy to modify based on feedback.

Read More about
Low-Fidelity Prototype
east

MVP Testing

MVP Testing stands for Minimum Viable Product Testing. It is a process of testing the basic version of a product with a limited set of features to gather feedback from early adopters and make improvements before launching the final product.

Read More about
MVP Testing
east

MVP Workshop

An MVP Workshop is a collaborative session where product managers, designers, developers, and stakeholders come together to define the Minimum Viable Product (MVP) for a new product or feature. The workshop aims to identify the core features and functionalities that will deliver the most value to users and the business, while minimizing development time and cost.

Read More about
MVP Workshop
east

MVP canvas

The MVP canvas is a tool used by product managers to define the minimum viable product (MVP) by identifying the key features, target users, and value proposition of the product. It helps in prioritizing the features and validating the product idea before investing resources in development.

Read More about
MVP canvas
east

Machine Learning

Machine Learning is a type of artificial intelligence that allows software applications to learn from the data and become more accurate in predicting outcomes without human intervention.

Read More about
Machine Learning
east

Marginal Gains

Marginal Gains is a product management strategy that focuses on making small, incremental improvements in various areas of a product or process, with the goal of achieving significant overall improvement.

Read More about
Marginal Gains
east

Market Requirements Document (MRD)

Market Requirements Document (MRD) is a document that outlines the needs, expectations, and demands of customers in the target market. It serves as a vital planning tool for product management teams to ensure products meet customer needs and are successful in the market.

Read More about
Market Requirements Document (MRD)
east

Market Validation

Market Validation is a process of testing a new product or service idea with potential customers to ensure that there is a demand for it and that it fits with their needs and preferences.

Read More about
Market Validation
east

Market research

Market research is the process of gathering, analyzing, and interpreting information about a market, product, or service to be offered for sale in that market. It involves identifying customer needs and preferences, evaluating competitors, and assessing market trends to inform product development and marketing strategies.

Read More about
Market research
east

Market segmentation

Market segmentation is the process of dividing a market into smaller groups of consumers with similar needs or characteristics, who are likely to exhibit similar purchase behavior.

Read More about
Market segmentation
east

Market sizing

Market sizing is the process of estimating the potential demand for a product or service in a particular market. It involves analyzing market data and trends to determine the size of the target market and the potential revenue that can be generated.

Read More about
Market sizing
east

Market sizing model

A market sizing model is a tool used by product managers to estimate the potential market size for a new product or service. It involves analyzing market data, such as demographics and consumer behavior, to determine the size of the target market and the potential revenue that can be generated.

Read More about
Market sizing model
east

Marketing

Marketing in Product Management refers to the process of identifying, anticipating, and satisfying customer needs and wants through the creation, promotion, and distribution of a product or service.

Read More about
Marketing
east

Marketing funnel

The marketing funnel is a model that represents the journey of a potential customer from initial awareness of a product or service to the eventual conversion into a paying customer. It is typically divided into stages such as awareness, consideration, and decision, with the goal of guiding the customer through each stage with targeted marketing efforts.

Read More about
Marketing funnel
east

Marketing mix

The marketing mix refers to the set of tactics and tools that a product manager uses to promote their product, including the four Ps: product, price, promotion, and place.

Read More about
Marketing mix
east

Marketing plan

A marketing plan is a comprehensive document or blueprint that outlines a company's advertising and marketing efforts for the coming year. It describes business activities involved in accomplishing specific marketing objectives within a set time frame.

Read More about
Marketing plan
east

Marketing strategy

Marketing strategy refers to a company's overall game plan for reaching potential customers and turning them into loyal customers of the product or service being offered. It involves identifying the target audience, understanding their needs and preferences, and developing a plan to promote the product or service in a way that resonates with the target audience.

Read More about
Marketing strategy
east

Marketing tactic

A marketing tactic is a specific action or strategy used to promote a product or service. It is designed to influence consumer behavior and increase sales or brand awareness. Examples of marketing tactics include advertising, social media campaigns, email marketing, and promotional events.

Read More about
Marketing tactic
east

Metadata

Metadata is data that provides information about other data. It includes information such as the title, author, date created, and keywords of a document or file. Metadata is used to help organize and manage large amounts of data.

Read More about
Metadata
east

Method of Procedure

Method of Procedure (MOP) is a structured approach used by product managers to describe the detailed steps and procedures required to complete a specific task or project.

Read More about
Method of Procedure
east

Metrics

Metrics are quantifiable measurements used to track and assess the performance of a product or feature. They provide insights into user behavior, product usage, and overall business impact, helping product managers make data-driven decisions.

Read More about
Metrics
east

Microservices

Microservices are a software development technique where applications are built as a collection of small, independent services that communicate with each other through APIs. Each service is designed to perform a specific task and can be deployed and scaled independently.

Read More about
Microservices
east

Milestones

Milestones are specific points in a product's development that are used to measure progress and success. They are often used to track key events or deliverables and help ensure that a product is meeting its goals and objectives.

Read More about
Milestones
east

Mind Mapping

Mind Mapping is a visual brainstorming technique used to organize and structure ideas. It involves creating a diagram that connects different concepts and ideas together, allowing for a more comprehensive understanding of a particular topic or problem.

Read More about
Mind Mapping
east

Minimal Viable Product (MVP)

A Minimal Viable Product (MVP) is a version of a product with just enough features to satisfy early customers and provide feedback for future product development iterations.

Read More about
Minimal Viable Product (MVP)
east

Minimum Desirable Product (MDP)

Minimum Desirable Product (MDP) is a product management strategy that focuses on creating a product with the minimum set of features that still delivers a desirable user experience. It aims to validate the product idea and gather feedback from early adopters before investing in further development.

Read More about
Minimum Desirable Product (MDP)
east

Minimum Marketable Feature (MMF)

Minimum Marketable Feature (MMF) is the smallest set of functionality in a product that can be released to the market and provide value to the customer.

Read More about
Minimum Marketable Feature (MMF)
east

Minimum Viable Experience (MVE)

Minimum Viable Experience (MVE) is a product management approach that focuses on creating the minimum viable version of an experience for a user or customer.

Read More about
Minimum Viable Experience (MVE)
east

Minimum Viable Feature (MVF)

Minimum Viable Feature (MVF) is the smallest set of features that can be developed to validate a product idea or test user feedback.

Read More about
Minimum Viable Feature (MVF)
east

Minimum Viable Product (MVP)

Minimum Viable Product (MVP) is a product development strategy in which a new product is developed with sufficient features to satisfy early adopters. It allows the product team to test the market with a basic version of the product before investing more time and resources into a fully-featured product.

Read More about
Minimum Viable Product (MVP)
east

Mission Statement

A mission statement is a concise statement that defines the purpose and objectives of a product or company. It outlines the company's overall strategy and provides a framework for decision-making and goal-setting.

Read More about
Mission Statement
east

MoSCoW Method

The MoSCoW Method is a prioritization technique used in product management to categorize features or requirements into four groups: Must have, Should have, Could have, and Won't have. This helps teams focus on delivering the most important features first.

Read More about
MoSCoW Method
east

MoSCoW Prioritization

MoSCoW Prioritization is a technique used in product management to prioritize tasks based on their importance. It stands for Must have, Should have, Could have, and Won't have. This method helps teams focus on the most critical tasks and allocate resources accordingly.

Read More about
MoSCoW Prioritization
east

Mobile Optimization

Mobile Optimization refers to the process of designing and adapting a website or application to ensure optimal performance and user experience on mobile devices, such as smartphones and tablets.

Read More about
Mobile Optimization
east

Mockup

A mockup is a visual representation of a product or feature that is used to test and validate design ideas before development begins. It can be a rough sketch or a detailed digital model, and is often used in the early stages of product development to gather feedback and make improvements.

Read More about
Mockup
east

Model-View-Controller (MVC)

Model-View-Controller (MVC) is a software design pattern that separates an application into three interconnected components: the model, the view, and the controller. The model represents the data and business logic of the application, the view displays the data to the user, and the controller handles user input and updates the model and view accordingly.

Read More about
Model-View-Controller (MVC)
east

Monetization

Monetization refers to the process of generating revenue from a product or service, typically through the implementation of pricing strategies, advertising, or other revenue-generating models.

Read More about
Monetization
east

Monthly Recurring Revenue

Monthly Recurring Revenue (MRR) is the predictable and recurring revenue generated by a subscription-based business model, calculated by multiplying the number of subscribers by the monthly subscription fee.

Read More about
Monthly Recurring Revenue
east

Monthly Recurring Revenue (MRR)

Monthly Recurring Revenue (MRR) is a metric used in product management to calculate the total revenue earned on a monthly basis from customers that are on subscription or recurring billing. It's a key performance indicator used to monitor the growth of a SaaS business.

Read More about
Monthly Recurring Revenue (MRR)
east

Multi-sided Platform

A multi-sided platform is a type of business model that facilitates interactions between two or more distinct groups of customers. These platforms create value by enabling direct interactions between these groups, which can include buyers and sellers, producers and consumers, or service providers and users.

Read More about
Multi-sided Platform
east

Multivariate Testing

Multivariate Testing is a technique used in product management to test multiple variations of a product or feature simultaneously in order to determine which combination of elements will yield the best results.

Read More about
Multivariate Testing
east

NPS (Net Promoter Score)

NPS (Net Promoter Score) is a metric used to measure customer loyalty and satisfaction by asking customers how likely they are to recommend a product or service to others on a scale of 0-10. The score is calculated by subtracting the percentage of detractors (those who score 0-6) from the percentage of promoters (those who score 9-10).

Read More about
NPS (Net Promoter Score)
east

Narrative Fallacy

Narrative Fallacy is a cognitive bias where individuals create a story or narrative to explain past events, even if the events are random or unconnected. This can lead to faulty decision-making and inaccurate predictions about the future.

Read More about
Narrative Fallacy
east

Natural Language Processing (NLP)

Natural Language Processing (NLP) is a subfield of artificial intelligence that focuses on the interaction between computers and humans using natural language. It involves the processing and analysis of large amounts of natural language data to extract meaning and insights.

Read More about
Natural Language Processing (NLP)
east

Nearshoring

Nearshoring is the practice of outsourcing business processes or services to a nearby country, often for cost savings or to access specialized talent while maintaining geographic proximity.

Read More about
Nearshoring
east

Needfinding

Needfinding is the process of identifying and understanding the needs, wants, and desires of customers in order to develop products that meet those needs. It involves gathering information through various research methods and using that information to inform product development decisions.

Read More about
Needfinding
east

Needs Assessment

Needs Assessment is the process of identifying and evaluating the needs and requirements of customers or users in order to develop products or services that meet those needs.

Read More about
Needs Assessment
east

Negative Feedback

Negative Feedback in Product Management refers to the process of providing constructive criticism or pointing out flaws in a product or feature, in order to improve it and meet customer needs better.

Read More about
Negative Feedback
east

Net Promoter Score (NPS)

Net Promoter Score (NPS) is a metric used in product management to measure customer loyalty and satisfaction by asking them how likely they are to recommend the product or service to friends and family.

Read More about
Net Promoter Score (NPS)
east

Network Effect

Network Effect refers to the phenomenon where the value of a product or service increases as more people use it. This effect can create a virtuous cycle where more users attract even more users, leading to exponential growth.

Read More about
Network Effect
east

New Product Development (NPD)

New Product Development (NPD) is the process of creating and bringing a new product to the market, from ideation to launch. It involves market research, product design, testing, and commercialization.

Read More about
New Product Development (NPD)
east

Niche Market

A niche market is a small, specialized segment of a larger market that can be targeted by a product or service that meets their specific needs or preferences.

Read More about
Niche Market
east

Niche Product

A niche product is a product that is designed to meet the specific needs of a small and specialized market segment, rather than a mass market. It is often characterized by its unique features, high price point, and limited distribution channels.

Read More about
Niche Product
east

Node.js

Node.js is an open-source, cross-platform, back-end JavaScript runtime environment that executes JavaScript code outside a web browser.

Read More about
Node.js
east

Non-Disclosure Agreement (NDA)

A Non-Disclosure Agreement (NDA) is a legal contract between two or more parties that outlines confidential material, knowledge, or information that the parties wish to share with one another for certain purposes, but wish to restrict access to or by third parties.

Read More about
Non-Disclosure Agreement (NDA)
east

Non-Functional Requirements

Non-Functional Requirements are the characteristics that a product must have, such as performance, usability, security, and reliability, that are not related to its specific functionality.

Read More about
Non-Functional Requirements
east

Non-Linear Growth

Non-Linear Growth is a phenomenon where the growth of a product or company is not proportional to the increase in resources or inputs. It occurs when a product gains momentum and experiences exponential growth, often due to network effects or viral marketing.

Read More about
Non-Linear Growth
east

Nonlinear Scaling

Nonlinear Scaling is a product management strategy where the growth of a product or feature is not directly proportional to the resources invested. Instead, the growth curve is exponential, with a small investment resulting in significant growth, followed by diminishing returns as the product reaches saturation.

Read More about
Nonlinear Scaling
east

North Star Metric

The North Star Metric is a single metric that represents the core value that a product delivers to its customers. It is used as a guiding light for product development and decision-making, and helps to align the entire organization around a common goal.

Read More about
North Star Metric
east

Nurturing Leads

Nurturing Leads refers to the process of building relationships with potential customers and guiding them through the sales funnel with the goal of converting them into paying customers.

Read More about
Nurturing Leads
east

OKR (Objectives and Key Results)

OKR (Objectives and Key Results) is a goal-setting framework used by product management teams to define and track objectives and their measurable outcomes, or key results. It helps teams align their efforts towards a common goal and provides a way to measure progress and success.

Read More about
OKR (Objectives and Key Results)
east

OODA Loop

The OODA Loop is a decision-making framework that stands for Observe, Orient, Decide, and Act. It is used in product management to help teams make quick and effective decisions by continuously gathering information, analyzing it, and adapting to changing circumstances.

Read More about
OODA Loop
east

Objection Handling

Objection Handling is the process of addressing and overcoming objections or concerns that potential customers may have about a product or service, in order to increase sales and improve customer satisfaction.

Read More about
Objection Handling
east

Objectives and Key Results

Objectives and Key Results (OKRs) is a management framework used to set measurable goals and track their progress in order to achieve a defined objective.

Read More about
Objectives and Key Results
east

Objectives and Key Results (OKRs)

Objectives and Key Results (OKRs) is a goal-setting framework used by product management teams to define and track objectives and their outcomes. It involves setting specific, measurable, achievable, relevant, and time-bound (SMART) objectives and identifying key results that will indicate progress towards achieving those objectives.

Read More about
Objectives and Key Results (OKRs)
east

Observability

Observability in Product Management refers to the ability to measure and understand how a product is being used by customers, including its performance, user behavior, and any issues or errors that arise. This data is used to inform product decisions and improve the overall user experience.

Read More about
Observability
east

Offshoring

Offshoring is the practice of relocating a company's business process, such as manufacturing or customer support, to a foreign country in order to take advantage of lower labor costs and other economic factors.

Read More about
Offshoring
east

Onboarding

Onboarding is the process of integrating new users or customers into a product or service, providing them with the necessary information and resources to become familiar with the product and its features.

Read More about
Onboarding
east

One-Click Purchase

One-Click Purchase is a feature that allows customers to make a purchase with a single click, without the need to enter their payment and shipping information again.

Read More about
One-Click Purchase
east

Open Innovation

Open Innovation is a product management approach that involves collaborating with external parties to generate new ideas, develop products, and bring them to market. It involves sharing knowledge, resources, and risks with partners to create value for all parties involved.

Read More about
Open Innovation
east

Operational Efficiency

Operational Efficiency refers to the ability of a product or process to operate in a cost-effective manner while maintaining high levels of quality and productivity.

Read More about
Operational Efficiency
east

Operational Risk

Operational Risk refers to the risk of loss resulting from inadequate or failed internal processes, people, and systems or from external events. It includes risks such as fraud, human error, system failures, and legal and regulatory risks.

Read More about
Operational Risk
east

Opportunity Assessment

Opportunity Assessment is the process of evaluating potential product opportunities to determine their viability and potential impact on the business. It involves analyzing market trends, customer needs, and competitive landscape to identify gaps and opportunities for new or improved products.

Read More about
Opportunity Assessment
east

Opportunity Cost

Opportunity cost is the potential benefit that is foregone when choosing one option over another. It is the value of the next best alternative that must be given up in order to pursue a certain action.

Read More about
Opportunity Cost
east

Opportunity Score

Opportunity Score is a metric used by product managers to evaluate the potential of a new product or feature by assessing factors such as market size, competition, and customer demand.

Read More about
Opportunity Score
east

Opportunity Scoring

Opportunity Scoring is a product management technique used to evaluate and prioritize potential opportunities for a product.

Read More about
Opportunity Scoring
east

Opportunity Solution Tree

Opportunity Solution Tree is a tool used in product management to map out problems and corresponding solutions in a tree format. It helps in identifying opportunities for product innovation and simplifying complex problem-solving processes.

Read More about
Opportunity Solution Tree
east

Opt-In

Opt-In is a process of obtaining consent from a user or customer to receive marketing or promotional messages from a company or organization. It involves the user actively choosing to subscribe or sign up for the communication.

Read More about
Opt-In
east

Organizational Alignment

Organizational Alignment in Product Management refers to the process of ensuring that all departments and teams within a company are working towards the same goals and objectives, and that the product roadmap is aligned with the overall business strategy.

Read More about
Organizational Alignment
east

Outcome-based Product Management

Outcome-based Product Management is a product management approach that focuses on achieving specific business outcomes rather than just delivering features or outputs. It involves defining clear goals and metrics, prioritizing features based on their potential impact on those goals, and continuously measuring and iterating to ensure that the product is delivering the desired outcomes.

Read More about
Outcome-based Product Management
east

Outsourcing

Outsourcing is the practice of hiring a third-party company or individual to perform tasks or provide services that would traditionally be done in-house. This can include manufacturing, customer service, or software development, among other things.

Read More about
Outsourcing
east

PDCA Cycle

PDCA Cycle, short for Plan-Do-Check-Act Cycle, is a management model that outlines a continuous improvement process for businesses and organizations. It enables organizations to identify problems, develop solutions, and implement and monitor changes to achieve ongoing success.

Read More about
PDCA Cycle
east

PERT Chart

PERT Chart is a project management tool used to plan, schedule, and control complex tasks within a project. It stands for Program Evaluation and Review Technique Chart.

Read More about
PERT Chart
east

Patent

A patent is a legal document that gives inventors exclusive rights to their inventions for a certain period of time, preventing others from making, using, or selling the same invention without permission.

Read More about
Patent
east

Pay-per-click (PPC) advertising

Pay-per-click (PPC) advertising is a digital marketing model where advertisers pay a fee each time their ad is clicked. It is a way of buying visits to a website rather than attempting to earn those visits organically.

Read More about
Pay-per-click (PPC) advertising
east

Pendo

Pendo is a product management platform that allows businesses to collect and analyze user behavior data to optimize their product offerings.

Read More about
Pendo
east

Persona

A persona is a fictional representation of a target customer group that is used to guide product development decisions and marketing strategies. It includes demographic information, behavior patterns, goals, and pain points.

Read More about
Persona
east

Pivot

Pivot is a strategic change in a product's direction in response to market feedback, customer needs, or other external factors that may impact the product's success.

Read More about
Pivot
east

Planning Poker

Planning Poker is a consensus-based technique used by Agile product teams to estimate the effort required to complete a project or feature. It is a game-like approach that allows team members to contribute their perspective and knowledge to arrive at a shared estimate, which leads to more accurate and realistic planning.

Read More about
Planning Poker
east

Platform

A platform is a software or hardware system that provides a foundation for other products or services to be built upon. It typically includes a set of tools, APIs, and infrastructure that enable developers to create and deploy applications or services.

Read More about
Platform
east

Platform Product Manager

A Platform Product Manager is a professional responsible for the strategic planning, development, and execution of a platform product across different teams and stakeholders within an organization.

Read More about
Platform Product Manager
east

Positioning

Positioning is the process of identifying a product's unique features and benefits and communicating them to the target market in a way that differentiates it from competitors.

Read More about
Positioning
east

Pricing Strategy

Pricing strategy refers to the method a company uses to price its products or services. It involves setting a price that is attractive to customers and profitable for the company, taking into account factors such as production costs, competition, and customer demand.

Read More about
Pricing Strategy
east

Prioritization

Prioritization is a product management technique that involves ranking tasks or features based on their importance or value to the user, business, or project goals.

Read More about
Prioritization
east

Prioritization matrix

A prioritization matrix is a tool used in product management to help prioritize tasks or features based on their level of importance and urgency. It typically involves assigning scores to each task or feature based on criteria such as impact, effort, and risk, and then plotting them on a matrix to determine which ones should be tackled first.

Read More about
Prioritization matrix
east

Product

A tangible or intangible item that is created or produced by a company, business or organization that can be sold or offered to customers.

Read More about
Product
east

Product Adoption

Product Adoption refers to the overall process of introducing a new product to the market, and encouraging customers to buy and use it. It is the measurement of the degree to which a product has penetrated a specific market, and is being purchased and used by customers.

Read More about
Product Adoption
east

Product Analytics

Product Analytics refers to the process of collecting, analyzing, and interpreting data related to a product's usage, performance, and customer behavior to inform product decisions and improve its overall success.

Read More about
Product Analytics
east

Product Architecture

Product Architecture is the arrangement of components and subsystems that define the product's structure and functions.

Read More about
Product Architecture
east

Product Brief

A product brief is a concise document that outlines the key features, benefits, and user experience goals of a product. It serves as a communication tool between product managers, development teams, and stakeholders.

Read More about
Product Brief
east

Product Consolidation

Product consolidation is a process where a company combines multiple products or product lines into a single product offering to simplify their product offerings and improve efficiency.

Read More about
Product Consolidation
east

Product Council

Product Council refers to a team of stakeholders who gather together at regular intervals to assess a product's development and ensure alignment with business goals.

Read More about
Product Council
east

Product Critique

Product Critique is a process of collecting feedback from stakeholders on the performance, design, and functionality of a product

Read More about
Product Critique
east

Product Design

Product design is the process of creating a product’s aesthetics, functionality, and user experience. It includes every aspect of a product’s design, from its initial concept to its final production.

Read More about
Product Design
east

Product Designer

A product designer is responsible for designing and developing the look, feel, and functionality of a product.

Read More about
Product Designer
east

Product Development

Product Development is the process of creating a new product or improving an existing one through research, design, testing, and launch.

Read More about
Product Development
east

Product Development Cycle

The product development cycle is the process of creating, testing, and launching a new product or service in the market.

Read More about
Product Development Cycle
east

Product Development Manager

A product development manager is a professional responsible for overseeing the entire process of product development from concept to launch.

Read More about
Product Development Manager
east

Product Development Process

Product Development Process (PDP) is the systematic and structured approach to designing, developing, testing, and launching a product. PDP covers various stages that are required to create and market a successful product.

Read More about
Product Development Process
east

Product Differentiation

Product differentiation refers to the process of developing and promoting differences between similar products in order to distinguish them from each other and attract customers.

Read More about
Product Differentiation
east

Product Discovery

Product Discovery is the process of identifying and validating a product idea through research, experimentation, and customer feedback to determine if it is worth pursuing.

Read More about
Product Discovery
east

Product Disruptor

Product Disruptor refers to the introduction of a new product or service that fundamentally changes or revolutionizes an existing market space, forcing competitors to adapt or fall behind.

Read More about
Product Disruptor
east

Product Enablement

Product Enablement is the process of equipping a product team with the essential skills, tools, resources, and knowledge to successfully develop, launch, and market a product.

Read More about
Product Enablement
east

Product Engagement Score

A Product Engagement Score is a metric used by product managers to evaluate the level of interaction and activity of users with their product.

Read More about
Product Engagement Score
east

Product Excellence

Product Excellence refers to the process of producing and marketing high-quality products that meet or exceed customer expectations and standards. It involves various activities such as defining product vision, development, launch, and continuous improvement to deliver value to customers.

Read More about
Product Excellence
east

Product Launch

Product Launch refers to the process of introducing a new product to the market. It involves various activities such as market research, product development, marketing, and sales to ensure a successful launch.

Read More about
Product Launch
east

Product Launch Management

Product Launch Management refers to the process of planning, coordinating, and executing the release of a new product or service to the market.

Read More about
Product Launch Management
east

Product Launch Manager

A Product Launch Manager is a professional who manages and coordinates cross-functional teams to successfully launch a new product or service to the market.

Read More about
Product Launch Manager
east

Product Launch Timeline

A product launch timeline is a strategic plan that outlines the specific actions and milestones that a product development team must complete to launch a new product. It includes a detailed schedule with deadlines for product design, testing, production, marketing, and distribution.

Read More about
Product Launch Timeline
east

Product Leadership

Product Leadership is a management approach that focuses on driving innovation, customer satisfaction, and market growth through effective product development and execution.

Read More about
Product Leadership
east

Product Led Growth

Product Led Growth is a business strategy that focuses on using the product itself as the main driver of customer acquisition, retention, and expansion, rather than relying on traditional sales and marketing tactics.

Read More about
Product Led Growth
east

Product Life Cycle

The Product Life Cycle is a marketing concept that tracks the stages of a product's lifespan, from its development to its decline and eventual discontinuation.

Read More about
Product Life Cycle
east

Product Management Audit

Product Management Audit is an evaluation of a company's product management capabilities, processes, and practices.

Read More about
Product Management Audit
east

Product Management Talent

Product Management Talent refers to a combination of skills, competencies, and experience necessary for individuals who manage a product from ideation to post-launch operations.

Read More about
Product Management Talent
east

Product Marketing Manager

A Product Marketing Manager (PMM) is responsible for developing marketing strategies, creating product messaging, and positioning products to make them more appealing to customers.

Read More about
Product Marketing Manager
east

Product Metrics

Product Metrics refer to the quantitative measurements that help product managers analyze and understand the performance of their products. These metrics help to determine if the product is meeting its goals, identify areas for improvement and make data-driven decisions for the product roadmap.

Read More about
Product Metrics
east

Product Mission

A product mission is a statement that describes the purpose and goals of a product. It outlines the problem the product solves and the value it delivers to customers.

Read More about
Product Mission
east

Product Mix Strategy

Product mix strategy refers to a marketing plan that a company uses to determine which products to sell, how to position them in the market, and how to allocate resources to each product based on its potential profitability.

Read More about
Product Mix Strategy
east

Product Operating Model

A product operating model is the set of processes, tools and activities in a business that enable a product team to develop and support products throughout their lifecycle.

Read More about
Product Operating Model
east

Product Operating Model

"What is a Product Operating Model?" refers to the set of processes and strategies used by a company to ensure successful development, delivery, and maintenance of their products.

Read More about
Product Operating Model
east

Product Ops

"Product Ops" is a emerging function in a company's product management team. The role involves improving product development processes, allowing for efficient cross-functional collaboration, and decision-making based on data-driven insights.

Read More about
Product Ops
east

Product Optimization

Product Optimization is the process of improving the performance and profitability of a company's products through a continuous loop of testing and analysis.

Read More about
Product Optimization
east

Product Planning

Product planning is the process of defining a product strategy and roadmap based on customer and market research, as well as business goals and resources.

Read More about
Product Planning
east

Product Portfolio Management

Product Portfolio Management is a strategic approach that helps businesses to manage their collection of products or services in a coordinated manner to achieve their objectives.

Read More about
Product Portfolio Management
east

Product Portfolio Manager

Product Portfolio Manager is a professional responsible for overseeing a company's entire product portfolio, from development and launch to end-of-life.

Read More about
Product Portfolio Manager
east

Product Prioritization Frameworks

Product Prioritization Frameworks are a set of guidelines or methodologies used by product managers to prioritize features, enhancements, and bug fixes for a product. These frameworks help product managers make data-driven decisions by considering factors such as customer needs, business goals, technical feasibility, and market trends.

Read More about
Product Prioritization Frameworks
east

Product Process Matrix

Product Process Matrix is a tool used by product managers to assess the potential of a new product or optimize an existing one by analyzing the impact of product and process decisions on cost, speed, quality, and flexibility.

Read More about
Product Process Matrix
east

Product Profitability

Product Profitability is a measurement of the profitability of a product or group of products calculated by subtracting the total cost of production, marketing and selling from the total revenue generated. The result is the profit margin of a product which can help managers to decide whether to continue the production of the product or to discontinue it.

Read More about
Product Profitability
east

Product Requirements Document

The Product Requirements Document (PRD) is a written document that outlines the requirements, features, and functionality of a product. It serves as a guide for the development team and stakeholders, ensuring that everyone is aligned on the goals and objectives of the product.

Read More about
Product Requirements Document
east

Product Requirements Document (PRD)

A Product Requirements Document (PRD) is a formal document that outlines the requirements, features, and functionality of a product. It serves as a guide for the development team and ensures that all stakeholders are aligned on the product vision and goals.

Read More about
Product Requirements Document (PRD)
east

Product Requirements Management

Product Requirements Management refers to the process of identifying, documenting, prioritizing, tracking and managing the requirements, needs and expectations of a product throughout its lifecycle.

Read More about
Product Requirements Management
east

Product Sense

Product sense is the ability to understand user needs, identify gaps in the market, and make informed decisions about product development and strategy.

Read More about
Product Sense
east

Product Specs

Product Specs specify the features, functionalities, and requirements of a product being developed by a team to ensure that it meets the needs of the stakeholders and end-users.

Read More about
Product Specs
east

Product Stack

Product Stack refers to a visual representation of all the products offered by a company that are part of its overall product portfolio.

Read More about
Product Stack
east

Product Strategist

A product strategist is responsible for developing and executing a long-term product vision and strategy that aligns with a company's overall goals, as well as identifying new market opportunities and enhancing existing products.

Read More about
Product Strategist
east

Product Strategy Framework

A product strategy framework is a systematic approach to developing and implementing a plan to achieve long-term success for a product. It involves defining the product vision, identifying target customers, analyzing the market, developing a roadmap, and executing the plan.

Read More about
Product Strategy Framework
east

Product Tree

Product Tree refers to a visual representation of a product hierarchy that shows the relationships between the items in a product lineup. It is a useful tool for product managers to organize and plan their product offerings.

Read More about
Product Tree
east

Product Vision

Product Vision is a high-level statement that describes the long-term goals and aspirations of a product. It outlines the purpose, target customers, and unique value proposition of the product, and serves as a guiding light for the product development team.

Read More about
Product Vision
east

Product Vulnerability

Product vulnerability refers to the susceptibility of a product to risks that can compromise its security, potential harm and reputation.

Read More about
Product Vulnerability
east

Product backlog

The product backlog is a prioritized list of features, enhancements, and bug fixes that a product team maintains for a product. It serves as the single source of truth for the product and guides the team's work in delivering value to customers.

Read More about
Product backlog
east

Product lifecycle

Product lifecycle refers to the stages a product goes through from its conception to its eventual retirement. These stages include development, introduction, growth, maturity, and decline.

Read More about
Product lifecycle
east

Product manager

A product manager is responsible for the strategy, roadmap, and feature definition of a product or product line. They work closely with cross-functional teams, including engineering, design, and marketing, to ensure a product's success in the market.

Read More about
Product manager
east

Product owner

The product owner is the person responsible for defining and prioritizing the product backlog and ensuring that the development team delivers the most valuable features and functionality first.

Read More about
Product owner
east

Product positioning

Product positioning is the process of identifying a product's unique value proposition and target market, and creating a strategy to communicate that value proposition to the target market in a way that differentiates the product from competitors.

Read More about
Product positioning
east

Product roadmap

A product roadmap is a high-level visual summary that outlines the vision and direction of a product offering over time. It communicates the why and what behind what you’re building. A roadmap is a guiding strategic document as well as a plan for executing the strategy.

Read More about
Product roadmap
east

Product strategy

Product strategy is a long-term plan for the development and management of a product or product portfolio. It outlines the goals, target market, competitive landscape, and differentiation of the product to ensure its success in the market.

Read More about
Product strategy
east

Product-Centric

Product-Centric is a strategic approach to product management that places the product at the center of decision-making and focuses on continuously optimizing the product to achieve business goals.

Read More about
Product-Centric
east

Product-Led Organization

Product-Led Organization is a company approach that prioritizes delivering value through the product, with cross-functional product teams focused on customer success and growth.

Read More about
Product-Led Organization
east

Product-market fit

Product-market fit is the degree to which a product satisfies the demands of the market it is intended for, and is able to gain traction and generate revenue.

Read More about
Product-market fit
east

Product-market fit matrix

The Product-market fit matrix is a tool used by product managers to evaluate the fit between a product and its target market. It helps to identify the areas where the product needs improvement to better meet the needs of the market.

Read More about
Product-market fit matrix
east

Product-market fit survey

A product-market fit survey is a research tool used by product managers to determine how well their product meets the needs of their target market. It involves gathering feedback from customers to identify areas of improvement and ensure that the product is aligned with market demand.

Read More about
Product-market fit survey
east

Product-market fit survey questions

Product-market fit survey questions are a set of questions designed to gather feedback from potential customers to determine if a product meets their needs and solves their problems. These surveys help product managers understand if their product is a good fit for the market and identify areas for improvement.

Read More about
Product-market fit survey questions
east

Program Management

Program management refers to the coordination and management of multiple related projects that are aligned with organizational goals and objectives. It involves overseeing interdependent projects, managing shared resources, and ensuring that the collective effort is delivering intended benefits.

Read More about
Program Management
east

Program Manager

A Program Manager is a professional who oversees a group of related projects to achieve strategic objectives. They are responsible for planning, coordinating, and tracking the program's progress while managing risks and dependencies between the different projects within the program.

Read More about
Program Manager
east

Project Management

Project Management is the process of planning, organizing, and managing resources to complete a specific project within defined scope, time, and budget constraints.

Read More about
Project Management
east

Project Manager

A project manager is responsible for planning, executing, and closing projects within an organization. This involves coordinating team members, stakeholders, and resources to ensure projects are completed on time, within budget, and to the satisfaction of all involved parties.

Read More about
Project Manager
east

Project Roadmap

Project Roadmap is a visual representation of a project's goals, timelines, and deliverables that shows the high-level overview of the project's progress, targets, and milestones.

Read More about
Project Roadmap
east

Prototyping

Prototyping is the process of creating a preliminary model or sample of a product to test and validate its design, functionality, and usability before the final product is developed and released to the market.

Read More about
Prototyping
east

Public relations (PR)

Public relations (PR) in Product Management refers to the strategic communication between a company and its stakeholders, including customers, investors, and the media, with the goal of building and maintaining a positive image and reputation for the company and its products.

Read More about
Public relations (PR)
east

Quality Assurance

Quality Assurance in Product Management refers to the process of ensuring that a product meets the desired level of quality and performance before it is released to the market. This involves testing the product for defects, identifying areas for improvement, and making necessary changes to ensure customer satisfaction.

Read More about
Quality Assurance
east

Quality Assurance (QA)

Quality Assurance (QA) in Product Management refers to the process of ensuring that a product meets the required quality standards and specifications. It involves testing the product for defects, identifying areas for improvement, and implementing corrective measures to enhance the product's quality.

Read More about
Quality Assurance (QA)
east

Quality Function Deployment (QFD)

Quality Function Deployment (QFD) is a product management technique that helps in translating customer requirements into technical specifications for a product or service. It involves a structured approach to identify customer needs, prioritize them, and align them with the product development process.

Read More about
Quality Function Deployment (QFD)
east

Quantitative Analysis

Quantitative Analysis in Product Management refers to the use of numerical data and statistical methods to measure and analyze product performance, customer behavior, and market trends.

Read More about
Quantitative Analysis
east

Quick Wins

Quick Wins refer to small, achievable goals that can be accomplished quickly and easily by a product team. These wins can help build momentum and confidence, and can be used to demonstrate progress to stakeholders.

Read More about
Quick Wins
east

RICE Scoring

RICE Scoring is a product management framework used to prioritize features or projects based on their potential impact, confidence in the outcome, and the resources required to implement them. RICE stands for Reach, Impact, Confidence, and Effort.

Read More about
RICE Scoring
east

RICE Scoring Model

RICE Scoring Model is a prioritization framework used by product managers to evaluate potential initiatives in terms of reach, impact, confidence, and effort.

Read More about
RICE Scoring Model
east

Rapid Application Development (RAD)

Rapid Application Development (RAD) is a software development methodology that emphasizes iterative prototyping and quick feedback cycles to deliver applications in a fraction of the time traditional methods would take.

Read More about
Rapid Application Development (RAD)
east

Rapid Experimentation

Rapid experimentation is an iterative process used in product management to test new ideas, features or products quickly and efficiently, usually via A/B testing or other scientific methods.

Read More about
Rapid Experimentation
east

Rapid Prototyping

Rapid Prototyping is the process of quickly creating a working model of a product or feature in order to test and validate its design and functionality before investing significant time and resources into development.

Read More about
Rapid Prototyping
east

Rational Product Management

Rational Product Management is a systematic approach to managing product development and release by analyzing data, measuring performance, and optimizing resources.

Read More about
Rational Product Management
east

Real Options

Real Options is a concept in Product Management that refers to the ability to make decisions based on the value of future opportunities, rather than just the value of present options.

Read More about
Real Options
east

Refactoring

Refactoring is the process of restructuring existing code without changing its external behavior to improve its readability, maintainability, and performance.

Read More about
Refactoring
east

Regression Testing

Regression Testing is the process of testing changes made to a product to ensure that previously working functionality has not been impacted. It involves re-executing test cases that were previously passed to ensure that they still pass after the changes have been made.

Read More about
Regression Testing
east

Release Demo

Release Demo is the presentation of the latest version of a software or product to stakeholders, customers, and end-users.

Read More about
Release Demo
east

Release Management

Release Management is the process of planning, scheduling, coordinating, and controlling the deployment of software releases to production environments, ensuring that the release is delivered on time, within budget, and with the desired quality.

Read More about
Release Management
east

Release Notes

Release Notes are a document that outlines the changes, bug fixes, and new features included in a software release. They are typically provided to users or customers to inform them of what has been updated in the product.

Read More about
Release Notes
east

Release plan

A release plan is a document that outlines the schedule and scope of a product release, including the features and functionality that will be included in the release, the timeline for development and testing, and any dependencies or risks that may impact the release.

Read More about
Release plan
east

Release train

A release train is a planning and delivery mechanism used in Agile software development that aligns multiple teams to a common release schedule. It ensures that all teams are working towards the same goal and that the product is delivered on time and with high quality.

Read More about
Release train
east

Release window

Release window refers to a specific period of time during which a product or software release is scheduled to be launched. It is a predetermined timeframe that is agreed upon by the product management team and stakeholders to ensure that the release is delivered on time and meets the desired quality standards.

Read More about
Release window
east

Requirements Analysis

Requirements Analysis is the process of identifying, documenting, and prioritizing the needs and wants of stakeholders in order to develop a product that meets their expectations and requirements.

Read More about
Requirements Analysis
east

Requirements Gathering

Requirements Gathering is the process of identifying, analyzing, and documenting the needs and constraints of stakeholders for a product or project, in order to guide the development and delivery of a successful solution.

Read More about
Requirements Gathering
east

Requirements Traceability Matrix

A Requirements Traceability Matrix (RTM) is a document used to track and manage the relationship between requirements and other artifacts throughout the product development lifecycle.

Read More about
Requirements Traceability Matrix
east

Resource Allocation

Resource allocation in product management refers to the process of assigning and distributing resources, such as time, money, and personnel, to various tasks and projects in order to optimize productivity and achieve business goals.

Read More about
Resource Allocation
east

Responsive Design

Responsive Design is an approach to web design that ensures a website is easily viewable and usable on any device, regardless of screen size or orientation.

Read More about
Responsive Design
east

Retention

Retention refers to the ability of a company to keep existing customers engaged and loyal to their brand.

Read More about
Retention
east

Retention Rate

Retention Rate is the percentage of customers or users who continue to use a product or service over a given period of time. It is a key metric for measuring customer loyalty and the effectiveness of a company's efforts to retain customers.

Read More about
Retention Rate
east

Retrospective

Retrospective is a product management technique where the team reflects on the recent sprint or project to identify what went well, what didn't go well, and how to improve in the future.

Read More about
Retrospective
east

Return on Investment (ROI)

Return on Investment (ROI) is a performance measure used to evaluate the efficiency or profitability of an investment. It measures the amount of return on an investment relative to the investment's cost.

Read More about
Return on Investment (ROI)
east

Revenue Growth

Revenue Growth refers to the increase in a company's income over a period of time, typically measured in quarters or years. It is a key metric for evaluating a company's financial health and success.

Read More about
Revenue Growth
east

Revenue Model

A revenue model is a framework for generating income from a product or service. It outlines the pricing strategy, target market, and revenue streams for a product or service.

Read More about
Revenue Model
east

Risk Management

Risk Management in Product Management refers to the process of identifying, assessing, and mitigating potential risks that may impact the success of a product. It involves analyzing the likelihood and impact of risks and developing strategies to minimize their effects.

Read More about
Risk Management
east

Roadmap

A roadmap is a high-level visual representation of a product's strategic direction, outlining the goals and objectives of the product over time. It provides a framework for decision-making and helps align stakeholders around a common vision.

Read More about
Roadmap
east

Roadmap Milestones

Roadmap milestones are specific goals or objectives that a product team aims to achieve at a certain point in time. These milestones help to track progress and ensure that the team is on track to meet the overall product roadmap.

Read More about
Roadmap Milestones
east

Roadmap Revolution

Roadmap Revolution is a product management methodology that focuses on creating a strategic product roadmap that aligns with the company's overarching goals and objectives.

Read More about
Roadmap Revolution
east

Roadmap theme

A Roadmap theme is a high-level category or area of focus within a product roadmap that helps to organize and prioritize initiatives and goals. It provides a framework for product managers to communicate the strategic direction of the product to stakeholders.

Read More about
Roadmap theme
east

Roadmapping Tool

A Roadmapping Tool is a software used by product managers to develop a plan of action and prioritize the features and functionalities of a product.

Read More about
Roadmapping Tool
east

Root Cause Analysis

Root Cause Analysis is a problem-solving technique used to identify the underlying cause of a problem or issue. It involves investigating the symptoms of a problem and tracing them back to their source in order to address the root cause and prevent the problem from recurring.

Read More about
Root Cause Analysis
east

Runbook

A runbook is a document or set of instructions that describe how to carry out a particular process or procedure. In product management, a runbook may be used to outline the steps required to launch a new product or to manage ongoing product operations.

Read More about
Runbook
east

SMART Goal Setting

SMART goal setting is a technique for creating well-defined goals that are specific, measurable, achievable, relevant, and time-bound.

Read More about
SMART Goal Setting
east

SWOT analysis

SWOT analysis is a strategic planning technique used to identify and evaluate the Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Threats of a product or business. It helps product managers to make informed decisions and develop effective strategies.

Read More about
SWOT analysis
east

SaaS

SaaS (Software as a Service) is a software delivery model where the software is hosted on a cloud-based server and accessed through the internet, allowing users to access the software from anywhere with an internet connection.

Read More about
SaaS
east

Sales

Sales in Product Management refers to the process of selling the product to customers, which involves identifying potential customers, understanding their needs, and persuading them to make a purchase.

Read More about
Sales
east

Sales Enablement

Sales Enablement is the process of providing sales teams with the resources and tools they need to effectively engage with customers and close deals.

Read More about
Sales Enablement
east

Sales funnel

A sales funnel is a visual representation of the customer journey, from initial awareness of a product or service to eventual conversion. It outlines the various stages in the buying process, and helps businesses to track the progress of their leads and identify areas for improvement.

Read More about
Sales funnel
east

Scalability

Scalability refers to the ability of a product or system to handle increasing amounts of work or traffic without compromising performance or reliability.

Read More about
Scalability
east

Scaled Agile Framework

Scaled Agile Framework (SAFe) is a methodology for managing and coordinating large-scale projects involving multiple Agile teams.

Read More about
Scaled Agile Framework
east

Scope Creep

Scope creep refers to the gradual, uncontrolled expansion of a project's goals and deliverables beyond its original scope.

Read More about
Scope Creep
east

Scrum

Scrum is an agile framework for managing and completing complex projects. It emphasizes teamwork, collaboration, and iterative progress towards a well-defined goal.

Read More about
Scrum
east

Scrum Agile Framework

Scrum Agile Framework is a methodology that enables teams to work collaboratively, adapt to change, and produce high-quality results.

Read More about
Scrum Agile Framework
east

Scrum Meeting

Scrum Meeting is a daily meeting in agile software development where team members discuss progress, plan for the day's work, and address issues.

Read More about
Scrum Meeting
east

Scrum artifact

A Scrum artifact is a tangible and visible item created during the Scrum process, such as the product backlog, sprint backlog, and increment. These artifacts help the Scrum team to plan, track progress, and communicate effectively.

Read More about
Scrum artifact
east

Scrum event

Scrum event is a time-boxed event in the Scrum framework where the team plans, inspects, and adapts their work. It includes Sprint Planning, Daily Scrum, Sprint Review, and Sprint Retrospective.

Read More about
Scrum event
east

Scrum master

A Scrum master is a facilitator for an agile development team. They are responsible for ensuring that the team follows Scrum processes, and that the team is productive, and that the team is continuously improving.

Read More about
Scrum master
east

Scrum team

A Scrum team is a cross-functional group of individuals who work together to deliver a potentially shippable product increment at the end of each sprint. The team is self-organizing and responsible for managing their own work and progress towards the sprint goal.

Read More about
Scrum team
east

Scrumban

Scrumban is a hybrid methodology that combines aspects of Scrum and Kanban project management frameworks. It aims to provide flexibility while still retaining elements of Agile methodologies.

Read More about
Scrumban
east

Service Level Agreement (SLA)

A Service Level Agreement (SLA) is a contract between a service provider and a customer that outlines the level of service that will be provided, including metrics such as uptime, response time, and resolution time. It also includes consequences for failing to meet the agreed-upon service levels.

Read More about
Service Level Agreement (SLA)
east

Shadow IT

Shadow IT refers to the use of technology applications, systems or services that are not approved by an organization's IT department but are used by employees for work-related purposes. These unapproved technologies are often brought into the organization by individual employees either for convenience, productivity or because the IT department is too slow in delivering the required technology solutions.

Read More about
Shadow IT
east

Shape Up Method

The Shape Up Method is a product development framework created by Basecamp that emphasizes problem solving and team collaboration while also prioritizing flexibility and autonomy for teams.

Read More about
Shape Up Method
east

Shipyard Engine

Shipyard Engine is an open-source tool used for deploying and managing Docker containers.

Read More about
Shipyard Engine
east

Six Sigma

Six Sigma is a data-driven methodology used to improve business processes by identifying and removing the causes of defects and minimizing variability in manufacturing and business processes.

Read More about
Six Sigma
east

Social media marketing

Social media marketing is the process of promoting a product or service through social media platforms such as Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram. It involves creating and sharing content, engaging with followers, and analyzing metrics to improve marketing strategies.

Read More about
Social media marketing
east

Software Development Life Cycle (SDLC)

The Software Development Life Cycle (SDLC) is a process used by software development teams to design, develop, test, and deploy high-quality software. It typically includes stages such as planning, requirements gathering, design, coding, testing, and maintenance.

Read More about
Software Development Life Cycle (SDLC)
east

Sprint

A sprint is a time-boxed period of product development where a cross-functional team works to complete a set amount of work, typically lasting 1-4 weeks. The goal of a sprint is to deliver a potentially shippable product increment.

Read More about
Sprint
east

Sprint Backlog

A Sprint Backlog is the set of items that a development team has committed to delivering during a sprint or iteration. These items are typically user stories or tasks and are based on the priorities set by the product owner.

Read More about
Sprint Backlog
east

Sprint Goal

The Sprint Goal is a short term objective set for a Scrum team to achieve during a specific sprint, based on the Product Goal.

Read More about
Sprint Goal
east

Sprint Planning

Sprint Planning is a Product Management term that refers to the process of planning and prioritizing work for a specific period of time, usually 1-4 weeks, in order to achieve a set of goals or objectives. It involves the Product Manager and the development team collaborating to determine what work will be done during the sprint, how it will be done, and what resources will be required.

Read More about
Sprint Planning
east

Sprints

Sprints are time-boxed periods of work, usually one to four weeks long, during which a product team focuses on completing a specific set of tasks. Sprints are a key component of the Agile development methodology.

Read More about
Sprints
east

Stakeholder

A stakeholder is any individual or group that has an interest in the success of a product, including customers, employees, investors, partners, and suppliers.

Read More about
Stakeholder
east

Stakeholder Analysis

Stakeholder analysis refers to the process of identifying key stakeholders, understanding their needs and concerns, and developing strategies to engage and manage their expectations.

Read More about
Stakeholder Analysis
east

Stakeholder Management

Stakeholder management is the practice of identifying all stakeholders who are affected by a business or project and developing strategies to communicate and engage with them effectively.

Read More about
Stakeholder Management
east

Standup

Standup is a daily scrum meeting held by product teams to discuss progress, plans, and challenges on their tasks and projects.

Read More about
Standup
east

Story Mapping

Story Mapping is a Agile product management technique used to visualize and prioritize user stories based on customer experience and product goals

Read More about
Story Mapping
east

Story Points

Story Points represent the effort required to complete a user story based on complexity, uncertainty, and other factors.

Read More about
Story Points
east

Storyboarding

Storyboarding is a visual tool used in product management to illustrate user journeys, workflows, and features. It involves creating a series of sketches or images that depict the various stages of a user's interaction with a product or service.

Read More about
Storyboarding
east

Strategic Planning

Strategic Planning in Product Management is the process of defining the long-term goals and objectives of a product, and developing a roadmap to achieve those goals through a series of actionable steps.

Read More about
Strategic Planning
east

Success Metrics

Success Metrics are quantifiable measurements used to evaluate the success of a product or feature. These metrics can include user engagement, revenue, customer satisfaction, and other key performance indicators (KPIs).

Read More about
Success Metrics
east

Sunk Cost

Sunk Cost is a cost that has already been incurred and cannot be recovered, regardless of future outcomes.

Read More about
Sunk Cost
east

Surveys

Surveys are a research method used by product managers to gather feedback from customers and stakeholders. They typically involve a set of questions designed to collect data on user preferences, behaviors, and opinions, which can then be used to inform product development decisions.

Read More about
Surveys
east

System Integration

System Integration is the process of connecting different subsystems or components within a larger system to work together seamlessly. It involves ensuring that all the components are compatible and can communicate with each other effectively.

Read More about
System Integration
east

Target Market

Target Market refers to a specific group of consumers or businesses that a product or service is intended to serve. It is the segment of the overall market that a company has decided to focus its marketing efforts on in order to maximize sales and profitability.

Read More about
Target Market
east

Team Management

Team Management in Product Management refers to the process of overseeing and coordinating the work of a team of individuals to achieve the goals and objectives of a product. It involves assigning tasks, setting deadlines, providing feedback, and ensuring effective communication within the team.

Read More about
Team Management
east

Technical Debt

Technical Debt is a metaphorical term used in software development to describe the accumulated cost of maintaining and fixing code that was written quickly and without proper consideration for long-term maintainability. It is the cost of taking shortcuts in the development process that will eventually need to be paid back with interest.

Read More about
Technical Debt
east

Technical Product Manager

A Technical Product Manager is responsible for managing the development, launch, and maintenance of technology-based products. They have both technical and business expertise and are responsible for bridging the gap between the development team and business stakeholders.

Read More about
Technical Product Manager
east

Technical Specifications

Technical Specifications refer to a detailed description of the technical requirements and features of a product, including dimensions, materials, performance standards, and other technical details necessary for the development and production of the product.

Read More about
Technical Specifications
east

Test Cases

Test Cases are a set of conditions or variables under which a product or system is tested to ensure its functionality and quality. They are designed to validate that the product meets the requirements and specifications outlined in the product roadmap and design documents.

Read More about
Test Cases
east

Test Driven Development (TDD)

Test Driven Development (TDD) is a software development process where tests are written before the code is developed. The tests are used to guide the development process and ensure that the code meets the requirements specified by the tests.

Read More about
Test Driven Development (TDD)
east

The 4 Ds of Time Management

The 4 Ds of Time Management is a popular method for prioritizing tasks based on their urgency and importance.

Read More about
The 4 Ds of Time Management
east

The User Is Drunk

The User Is Drunk is a design and testing technique used in product management to ensure user-friendliness and simplicity of products.

Read More about
The User Is Drunk
east

Theme

A theme is a high-level strategic objective or goal that a product team works towards, often spanning multiple releases or sprints. It provides a unifying vision for the product and helps guide decision-making and prioritization.

Read More about
Theme
east

Thought Leadership

Thought Leadership refers to the process of establishing oneself or one's company as an expert in a particular industry or field by creating and sharing innovative ideas, insights, and perspectives through various channels such as blogs, social media, and public speaking.

Read More about
Thought Leadership
east

Time-to-Market (TTM)

Time-to-Market (TTM) is the amount of time it takes for a product to be developed, tested, and released to the market. It is a critical metric for product management as it directly impacts a product's success and competitiveness.

Read More about
Time-to-Market (TTM)
east

Timeline Roadmap

Timeline Roadmap is a visual representation of the project timeline indicating key milestones and deadline dates for each phase of the project’s lifecycle.

Read More about
Timeline Roadmap
east

Top of Funnel

Top of Funnel refers to the initial stage of the customer journey where potential customers become aware of a product or service. It involves creating brand awareness and generating leads through various marketing channels such as social media, advertising, and content marketing.

Read More about
Top of Funnel
east

Top-down Product Strategy

Top-down Product Strategy is a product management approach that starts with the company's overall business goals and then works downwards to determine the product strategy that will help achieve those goals.

Read More about
Top-down Product Strategy
east

Total Addressable Market (TAM)

Total Addressable Market (TAM) refers to the total market demand for a product or service, which includes all potential customers or users within a given geographical area or industry. It represents the maximum revenue opportunity available to a company if they were to capture 100% market share.

Read More about
Total Addressable Market (TAM)
east

Trade show marketing

Trade show marketing refers to the process of promoting a product or service through exhibitions, conferences, and other events where businesses showcase their offerings to potential customers and partners.

Read More about
Trade show marketing
east

Trade-Offs

Trade-offs in Product Management refer to the decisions made between two or more options, where choosing one option means sacrificing another. It involves weighing the pros and cons of each option and selecting the one that best aligns with the product goals and objectives.

Read More about
Trade-Offs
east

Training

Training in Product Management refers to the process of educating and developing the skills of product managers to effectively manage the product lifecycle, understand customer needs, and make data-driven decisions.

Read More about
Training
east

Transactional Email

Transactional Email refers to automated emails that are triggered by specific user actions or events, such as a welcome email after signing up for a service or a receipt after making a purchase. These emails are typically personalized and contain important information related to the user's interaction with the product or service.

Read More about
Transactional Email
east

Transparency

Transparency in Product Management refers to the practice of openly sharing information about the product development process, including goals, progress, and challenges, with stakeholders such as customers, team members, and executives.

Read More about
Transparency
east

Tribe Model Management

Tribe Model Management is a product management model that organizes teams of managers and designers around specific product areas or features.

Read More about
Tribe Model Management
east

Trust

Trust in Product Management refers to the confidence and reliance that customers, stakeholders, and team members have in the product manager's decisions, actions, and leadership. It is built through transparency, consistency, and accountability.

Read More about
Trust
east

Turnover Rate

Turnover rate refers to the percentage of employees who leave an organization during a certain period of time.

Read More about
Turnover Rate
east

UX Designer

A UX designer is a professional responsible for designing the user experience of a product, often working closely with product managers and developers. They typically create wireframes, prototypes, and conduct research to inform design decisions.

Read More about
UX Designer
east

Unique Selling Proposition

Unique Selling Proposition (USP) is a marketing strategy used to differentiate a product from its competitors by identifying unique features that make it stand apart in the market.

Read More about
Unique Selling Proposition
east

Unique Selling Proposition (USP)

Unique Selling Proposition (USP) is a marketing concept that refers to the unique benefit exhibited by a company, service, product or brand that enables it to stand out from competitors. It is a clear statement that describes the benefit of a product, service or brand, and how it is different from the competition.

Read More about
Unique Selling Proposition (USP)
east

Upselling

Upselling is a sales technique where a product manager persuades a customer to purchase a more expensive or upgraded version of a product they are already interested in buying.

Read More about
Upselling
east

Uptime

Uptime refers to the amount of time that a system or service is operational and available for use. It is often used as a measure of reliability and is typically expressed as a percentage of total time. For example, a system with 99.9% uptime would be available for use 99.9% of the time.

Read More about
Uptime
east

Usability testing

Usability testing is the process of evaluating a product or service by testing it with representative users to determine how easy or difficult it is to use.

Read More about
Usability testing
east

Use Case

A use case is a description of a specific scenario or situation in which a product or feature is used by a user to achieve a goal or solve a problem.

Read More about
Use Case
east

User Acquisition

User Acquisition refers to the process of acquiring new users or customers for a product or service through various marketing and advertising channels.

Read More about
User Acquisition
east

User Adoption

User Adoption refers to the process of getting users to accept and use a new product or feature. It involves understanding user needs, providing clear communication and training, and addressing any barriers to adoption.

Read More about
User Adoption
east

User Behavior Analytics (UBA)

User Behavior Analytics (UBA) is the process of collecting and analyzing data on how users interact with a product or service, in order to gain insights into their behavior and preferences. This information can be used to improve the user experience and drive product development decisions.

Read More about
User Behavior Analytics (UBA)
east

User Engagement

User Engagement refers to the level of interaction and involvement that users have with a product or service. It measures how much users are using and enjoying the product, and can be used to inform product development decisions.

Read More about
User Engagement
east

User Experience

User Experience or UX refers to the overall experience a user has while interacting with a product, system, or application.

Read More about
User Experience
east

User Interface

User Interface refers to the graphical and visual elements of an application or software that enable users to interact and navigate with the product effectively and efficiently.

Read More about
User Interface
east

User Journey

User Journey refers to the complete path a user takes while interacting with a product or service, from initial awareness to final conversion. It involves understanding the user's needs, motivations, and pain points at each stage of the journey and designing the product accordingly.

Read More about
User Journey
east

User Journey Map

A User Journey Map is a visual representation of the steps a user takes to achieve a specific goal while interacting with a product or service. It helps product managers understand the user's experience and identify pain points, opportunities for improvement, and areas for innovation.

Read More about
User Journey Map
east

User Needs

User Needs refer to the requirements and expectations of the end-users of a product or service. These needs are identified through research and analysis, and are used to guide the development and improvement of the product or service.

Read More about
User Needs
east

User Persona

A user persona is a fictional representation of a target user group that helps product managers understand the needs, behaviors, and goals of their users. It is based on research and data and is used to guide product development decisions.

Read More about
User Persona
east

User Requirements

User Requirements refer to the specific needs and expectations of the end-users for a product or service. These requirements are gathered through research and analysis and serve as the foundation for product development and design.

Read More about
User Requirements
east

User Research

User Research is the process of gathering insights and feedback from users to understand their needs, behaviors, and preferences. This information is used to inform product decisions and improve the user experience.

Read More about
User Research
east

User Stories

User Stories are short, simple descriptions of a feature told from the perspective of an end user. They are used to capture user requirements and help product teams understand what the user needs and wants.

Read More about
User Stories
east

User Testing

User Testing is the process of evaluating a product or feature by testing it with representative users to gather feedback and uncover usability issues.

Read More about
User Testing
east

User acceptance testing (UAT)

User acceptance testing (UAT) is the process of testing a product or service by the end-users to ensure that it meets their needs and requirements before it is released to the market.

Read More about
User acceptance testing (UAT)
east

User experience (UX)

User experience (UX) refers to the overall experience a user has when interacting with a product or service, including ease of use, accessibility, and satisfaction.

Read More about
User experience (UX)
east

User flow

User flow refers to the path a user takes through a product or website to complete a specific task. It includes all the steps, actions, and decisions a user makes along the way, from initial entry to final exit.

Read More about
User flow
east

User flow diagram

A user flow diagram is a visual representation of the steps a user takes to complete a task or achieve a goal on a website or application. It maps out the user's journey from start to finish, highlighting key actions, decision points, and potential roadblocks along the way.

Read More about
User flow diagram
east

User focus group

A user focus group is a market research technique used by product managers to gather feedback and insights from a group of users about a product or service. The group is typically moderated and the feedback is used to inform product development decisions.

Read More about
User focus group
east

User interface (UI)

User interface (UI) refers to the visual and interactive elements of a product that enable users to interact with it. This includes buttons, menus, forms, and other graphical elements that allow users to navigate and perform tasks within the product.

Read More about
User interface (UI)
east

User interview

A user interview is a qualitative research method used in product management to gather insights and feedback from users about their experiences, needs, and preferences. It involves asking open-ended questions and actively listening to the user's responses.

Read More about
User interview
east

User research methods

User research methods refer to the techniques and tools used by product managers to gather insights about the needs, behaviors, and preferences of their target users. These methods can include surveys, interviews, usability testing, and analytics, among others.

Read More about
User research methods
east

User story

A user story is a short, simple description of a feature told from the perspective of the person who desires the new capability, usually a user or customer of the system. It typically follows a simple template: 'As a [type of user], I want [some goal] so that [some reason].'

Read More about
User story
east

User story acceptance criteria

User story acceptance criteria are a set of conditions that a user story must meet to be considered complete and accepted by the product owner. These criteria define the boundaries of the story and ensure that it meets the needs of the user and the business.

Read More about
User story acceptance criteria
east

User story estimation

User story estimation is the process of assigning a relative size or effort to a user story, typically using a point system, in order to help the product team plan and prioritize work.

Read More about
User story estimation
east

User story map

A user story map is a visual representation of the user journey that helps product managers organize and prioritize features based on user needs and goals. It consists of a series of user stories arranged in a logical flow to provide a holistic view of the product and its functionality.

Read More about
User story map
east

User story points

User story points are a unit of measure used in agile software development to estimate the complexity of a user story. They are based on the amount of effort required to complete a task and are used to help the development team plan and prioritize their work.

Read More about
User story points
east

User story splitting

User story splitting is the process of breaking down a large user story into smaller, more manageable pieces that can be completed in a single sprint. This allows for more accurate estimation and better tracking of progress.

Read More about
User story splitting
east

User survey

A user survey is a research method used by product managers to gather feedback from users about their experiences with a product or service. It typically involves a set of questions that are designed to elicit specific information about user needs, preferences, and pain points.

Read More about
User survey
east

User survey questions

User survey questions are a set of questions designed to gather feedback and insights from users about a product or service. These questions can be used to identify user needs, preferences, and pain points, and can help inform product development decisions.

Read More about
User survey questions
east

User testing methods

User testing methods are techniques used by product managers to evaluate the usability and effectiveness of a product by observing how users interact with it. These methods include surveys, interviews, A/B testing, and usability testing.

Read More about
User testing methods
east

User-centered design

User-centered design is an approach to product development that focuses on understanding the needs and behaviors of users in order to create products that are intuitive, easy to use, and meet their needs.

Read More about
User-centered design
east

Validation

Validation in Product Management refers to the process of testing and verifying that a product or feature meets the needs and expectations of the target market, and is aligned with the overall product strategy and goals.

Read More about
Validation
east

Value Proposition

A value proposition is a statement that describes the unique benefit that a product or service provides to its customers and how it solves their problems or meets their needs in a way that is better than the competition.

Read More about
Value Proposition
east

Value Proposition Canvas

The Value Proposition Canvas is a tool used by product managers to analyze and design the value proposition of a product or service. It helps to identify the customer's needs, pains, and gains, and how the product can address them, while also considering the company's capabilities and resources.

Read More about
Value Proposition Canvas
east

Value vs. Complexity

Value vs. Complexity is the process of weighing the benefits of a product or feature against the effort needed to build and maintain it.

Read More about
Value vs. Complexity
east

Vanity Metrics

Vanity Metrics are data points that give the illusion of success but do not accurately measure the impact of a product or feature. These metrics often focus on surface-level engagement and can be misleading in terms of actual user behavior and business outcomes.

Read More about
Vanity Metrics
east

Velocity

Velocity is a metric used in Agile product management to measure the amount of work completed in a given time period. It is calculated by dividing the total amount of work completed by the time taken to complete it.

Read More about
Velocity
east

Vendor Management

Vendor Management is the process of managing relationships with third-party vendors who provide goods and/or services to a company. This includes selecting vendors, negotiating contracts, monitoring performance, and ensuring compliance with legal and regulatory requirements.

Read More about
Vendor Management
east

Venture Capital (VC)

Venture Capital (VC) is a type of private equity financing provided by investors to startups and early-stage companies with high growth potential. In exchange for funding, the investors receive equity in the company and often play an active role in its management and decision-making processes.

Read More about
Venture Capital (VC)
east

Version Control

Version control is a system that manages changes to a product's source code or other files, allowing multiple people to work on the same files without overwriting each other's changes. It tracks changes, allows for rollbacks, and ensures that everyone is working on the most up-to-date version of the product.

Read More about
Version Control
east

Video Marketing

Video Marketing is a marketing strategy that involves creating and sharing videos to promote a product or service, increase brand awareness, and engage with customers. It can be used for various purposes such as product demos, customer testimonials, and social media ads.

Read More about
Video Marketing
east

Viewport

Viewport refers to the visible area of a web page that is displayed on a device's screen. It is the part of the web page that a user can see without scrolling. The size of the viewport varies depending on the device and screen size.

Read More about
Viewport
east

Viral Marketing

Viral Marketing is a marketing strategy that utilizes social media and other online platforms to spread information about a product or service through word-of-mouth and social sharing, with the goal of creating a self-replicating viral effect that rapidly spreads the message to a large audience.

Read More about
Viral Marketing
east

Virtual Reality (VR)

Virtual Reality (VR) is a computer-generated simulation of a three-dimensional environment that can be interacted with in a seemingly real or physical way, using special electronic equipment such as a headset with a screen or gloves fitted with sensors.

Read More about
Virtual Reality (VR)
east

Vision Statement

A vision statement is a concise and inspirational statement that outlines the long-term aspirations and goals of a company or product. It serves as a guiding principle for decision-making and helps align stakeholders towards a common goal.

Read More about
Vision Statement
east

Visitor Behavior

Visitor Behavior refers to the actions and interactions of users on a website or application, including clicks, navigation paths, and engagement metrics. Understanding visitor behavior is crucial for product managers to optimize user experience and drive conversions.

Read More about
Visitor Behavior
east

Visualization

Visualization in Product Management refers to the process of creating visual representations of data or information to help stakeholders understand complex concepts and make informed decisions.

Read More about
Visualization
east

Voice of Customer (VOC)

Voice of Customer (VOC) is a product management technique that involves gathering feedback and insights directly from customers to understand their needs, preferences, and pain points. This information is used to inform product development and improve the overall customer experience.

Read More about
Voice of Customer (VOC)
east

Vulnerability Scanning

Vulnerability Scanning is the process of identifying security vulnerabilities in a system or network by scanning it with automated tools. It helps in identifying potential weaknesses that can be exploited by attackers and provides recommendations for remediation.

Read More about
Vulnerability Scanning
east

WIP (Work in Progress)

WIP (Work in Progress) refers to any task or project that is currently being worked on but has not yet been completed. It is a measure of the amount of unfinished work in a product development process.

Read More about
WIP (Work in Progress)
east

Waterfall

Waterfall refers to a traditional project management approach that follows a sequential process. In this approach, each stage must be completed before moving onto the next one, making it difficult to make changes once work has begun.

Read More about
Waterfall
east

Waterfall Methodology

The Waterfall Methodology is a linear project management approach where progress flows in one direction through a sequence of stages, with each stage dependent on the completion of the previous one.

Read More about
Waterfall Methodology
east

Web Analytics

Web Analytics is the measurement, collection, analysis, and reporting of web data for purposes of understanding and optimizing web usage.

Read More about
Web Analytics
east

Web Design

Web Design refers to the process of creating the visual layout and user interface of a website, including the use of typography, color schemes, and graphics to enhance the user experience.

Read More about
Web Design
east

Web Development

Web Development refers to the process of creating and maintaining websites, including aspects such as web design, web programming, and web content management.

Read More about
Web Development
east

Web Hosting

Web Hosting is a service that allows individuals and organizations to make their website accessible via the World Wide Web. It involves storing website files on a server and making them available to visitors online.

Read More about
Web Hosting
east

Web Scraping

Web Scraping is the process of extracting data from websites using automated software. It involves analyzing the HTML structure of a website and programmatically extracting relevant information.

Read More about
Web Scraping
east

Webhook

A webhook is a way for an application to provide other applications with real-time information by sending a POST request to a specified URL when a certain event occurs.

Read More about
Webhook
east

Webinar

A webinar is a live or pre-recorded online seminar or presentation that is delivered over the internet. It allows participants to interact with the presenter and other attendees in real-time through chat or Q&A features.

Read More about
Webinar
east

Weighted Scoring

Weighted Scoring is a product management technique that assigns a numerical value to each feature or requirement based on its importance to the overall product strategy. These values are then multiplied by a weight factor to calculate a score for each feature, which helps prioritize development efforts.

Read More about
Weighted Scoring
east

Weighted Shortest Job First (WSJF)

Weighted Shortest Job First (WSJF) is a prioritization technique used in agile product management to ensure that the highest value work is being worked on first based on a set of factors.

Read More about
Weighted Shortest Job First (WSJF)
east

What is a Backlog

A backlog is a prioritized list of features, bugs, and technical tasks that need to be addressed in a software development project.

Read More about
What is a Backlog
east

Whiteboard

A whiteboard is a flat, white surface used for brainstorming, planning, and visualizing ideas. It is commonly used in product management to facilitate collaboration and communication among team members.

Read More about
Whiteboard
east

Wiki

Wiki is a collaborative website that allows users to create, edit, and link pages together. It is a useful tool for product management teams to document and share information about products, features, and processes.

Read More about
Wiki
east

Win-Loss Analysis

Win-Loss Analysis is a process of gathering and analyzing feedback from customers who have either chosen to buy a product (win) or not (loss), in order to improve the product and sales strategy.

Read More about
Win-Loss Analysis
east

Wireframe

A wireframe is a visual representation of a product's layout and functionality, typically used in the early stages of product development to communicate design ideas and user flow.

Read More about
Wireframe
east

Wireframing

Wireframing is the process of creating a visual representation of a product's layout and functionality, typically using simple shapes and lines to depict the various elements and interactions. It is used to communicate design ideas and facilitate collaboration between designers, developers, and stakeholders.

Read More about
Wireframing
east

Wizard of Oz Testing

Wizard of Oz Testing is a technique used in product management where a prototype of a product is tested with users by simulating the full product experience through a human 'wizard' who manually performs the actions that the final product would automate.

Read More about
Wizard of Oz Testing
east

Workflow

Workflow refers to the series of steps or tasks that are required to complete a specific process or project. It involves the coordination of different teams and individuals to ensure that each step is completed efficiently and effectively.

Read More about
Workflow
east

Working Backwards (Used by Amazon)

Working Backwards is a product management technique used by Amazon where the team starts with the customer and works backwards to define the product, its features, and requirements.

Read More about
Working Backwards (Used by Amazon)
east

Workload

Workload in Product Management refers to the amount of work that a product manager or team is responsible for completing within a given period of time. This includes tasks such as prioritizing features, managing timelines, and communicating with stakeholders.

Read More about
Workload
east

eXtreme Programming (XP)

eXtreme Programming (XP) is a software development methodology that aims to improve software quality and responsiveness to changing customer requirements through frequent release cycles, continuous testing, and customer involvement.

Read More about
eXtreme Programming (XP)
east
No items found.